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Hungry Eyes


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I recently purchased the bonus pack DVD of "Dirty Dancing". I was SOOO excited to find the Hungry Eyes video is one of the bonuses!!! If it is the same video to which you refer, (which it MUST be), I couldn't agree more that there should be more Eric. But what IS there is a great treat! I'm so glad to have it since I don't have cable or satellite tv. laugh

cool chick auntie

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I have it too, and I also agree with Marie--every frame(!) I haven't seen it in ages, but if I remember, he's watching Dirty Dancing run on an old-fashioned film projector. I always got that he somehow fantasized himself into the film, not with Jennifer Grey, but some mystery woman or even women (there was also an Asian woman in the video briefly). In the end, he's back watching the film as it runs out.

Come on, Kirk, help me out here--you're so good at analyzing dreams and other things psychological. The meaning of this video sounds like a good "Ask Eric" question to me. He would know "the inside story." wink

smile --Darlene

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This video demonstrates what a well-placed saxaphone can do for a music video :rolleyes: What is real and what isn't? If it's your dream and you pursue it, does it become your reality? If it's there for the taking, and you don't pursue it, was it ever really there?

Hey- we don't need no stinking experts- we have THE MAN on board. Go ahead, Dar, 'ask Eric'. Kirk.

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The girl with the sax was the director's girlfriend at the time. I have a feeling that's one reason she got so much camera time. That, plus she was a lot better looking than I'll ever be. The oriental girl was actually in much more of the original cut, but, for some reason, someone decided that she shouldn't be featured so prominently, so they cut her out, except for that last shot. No one ever really told me what the point of any of it was, so your guess is as good as mine. I think the sax was my idea. About all I really remember about shooting the video is that we started at about 2 or 3 in the afternoon and finished at about 6 or 7 in the morning. About 5:00 A.M. the director came over to tell me we were going to do all my "close ups." I could only wonder about the logic of waiting until you've been up for 20 hours to then shoot all the close up shots. Duh! I could never figure out who that little pimpy looking guy who gets to kiss the girl at the end was. Or why he was there. Or why she kissed him. And then turned into an oriental girl. Or..........

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Thanks for answering, Eric. It makes me feel much better to know that you didn't know what the point of it was either. You look great, even if you were up for 20 hours before they shot your closeups. That makes you even better looking than the director's girlfriend. (But you were, anyway!) happy

smile --Darlene

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Its really peculair some of these videos. Ofcourse, from rap to rock, they put all these beautiful women in them so they are watched, but its almost absurd sometimes like,"what do these women have to do with this song?" At times its like watching some sort of Fellini film or something. Enter beautiful women with 16 midgets carrying baloons and lots of confetti and wind. Its as though sometimes there is no vision for these videos,which makes it all the more special when a director or band has tried to conceive of something that it has visual meaning beyond titillation and flashing lights. Many of these videos have to be the product of coke or amphetamines considering how frenetic they are.

Or perhaps made by directors with ADD.

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If you ask me, the best rock video ever made was "Every Breath You Take" by the Police. It relied on Sting's intensity as a performer to make it work. Very little editing. Great lighting. Great performance. Simple and beautiful. The band performing the song. No story line. No dancing girls. Just the performance. Video directors are all wannabe film directors. Directing videos is just a stepping stone for most of them. The ones I've worked with would rather die than ask an artist for his input. I could tell you stories..........! ec

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Well, beside the song and Eric himself, I think the sax player is brillant. And it turns out it was Eric's idea! I also liked the video, I Wanna Hear It From Your Lips of Eric on stage. The woman in the audience, ohhhh. She was the same one in the video I'm through With Love. Excellent casting! Oh, I better be PC...speaking as a red-blooded american male...I was deeply offended.

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I liked the Lips video too, 'cause as Eric said, it's nice to see the performer actually on stage instead of a full conceptual video. Here's an interesting quote Eric had somewhere:

"I Wanna Hear It From Your Lips" – "Three days after we had written 'Almost Paradise,(in 1 day)' Dean (Pitchford) dropped off some lyrics at my hotel. My first thought was, Hit title, if ever I saw one. By the time I had read through it once, I had composed the music in my head, it was that spontaneous a process. And that's how it appears on the album, without a changed syllable or note."

If memory serves Eric knocked out Let's Pretend and I Wanna Be with you in the same weekend his apartment.

4 hit songs in less than a week. Simply amazing. These songs came out like water out of a faucet, while, for example, some songs on Boats took much more effort and time.

As a composer, how does such on and off again bursts of inspiration happen? Or is their any explanation, it just happens?

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1980's, you say? Check out this "forward thinking" and imagine the possibilities.

I have a telegram from the head of Arista in Europe to an executive at Arista New York. It is dated April 16, 1980. TONIGHT YOU'RE MINE was scheduled for release in a couple of weeks and Arista had arranged for Eric to travel to Europe for a number of promotional appearances on European TV shows to support the new album. While there he was looking at the possibility of producing a "film" for his single, "Tonight You're Mine" but there was apparently a disagreement over what shape the video would take.

The telegram reads:

"I UNDERSTAND THAT ERIC WANTS SOMETHING IN THE VIDEO FIELD ALONG THE LINES OF A 'QUEEN' VIDEO…THIS WILL NOT BE A HUGE LAVISH PRODUCTION WITH ANIMATION AND ALL THE MULTIPLE GIMMICKS THAT QUEEN HAVE AT THEIR REGAL COMMAND…"

Well, needless to say, it doesn't appear that Eric had Arista's full support on this album now does it?

Imagine an Eric Carmen video along the lines of "Bohemian Rhapsody!"

Bernie

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Hi Bernie,

Wow... that memo says a lot in just a few words. Nothing like the full support and enthusiasm of your own label, huh?

PS: When I wrote "rock video form as it came to be in the 1980s" in my post above, I guess I was thinking in terms of the birth of MTV.

During the first months of MTV in the early 1980s, it seemed like the only videos in rotation were Fleetwood Mac's "Gypsy," Robert Palmer's "Clues," a couple of REO Speedwagons, and a Billy Squier song. But I do realize there were a number of videos made in the 1970s by various bands. Queen's "Bohemian Rhapsody" is a great example. Even going back to the mid-1960s, the Beatles started sending videos to the Ed Sullivan show and other outlets -- remember that great "Hello Goodbye" video?

Re: "Overnight Sensation"... That might be the prototypical video-in-waiting song. It's impossible to listen to it without visualizing what the singer is imagining.

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There used to be a TV show in Amsterdam (Vim, are you there?) called Top Pop. It was sort of Holland's version of American Bandstand. They had a pretty cheesy set that consisted of a stage with a sort of rainbow of colored lights on it. You would stand underneath the little" rainbow" and lip synch your song while the colored lights would flash around you. The whole thing wasn't very big and the lights were very close to you and extremely hot. Arista wanted me to fly to Europe and, while I was there, do the Top Pop show so they could use THAT as a video. I thought it would look really cheesy and tried to talk them into shooting a real video. They could get the Top Pop clip for almost nothing so that's what they wanted. I was dead set against using it. I did eventually fly to Amsterdam to do the show. but I think I killed it being used as a video. We also had to have an emergency landing when our plane reached Amsterdam. The last thing the pilot said was "Brace for impact" as the plane attempted to touch down. Needless to say, I was just thrilled. ec

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