Jump to content

Effects Pedals


Billy K.

Recommended Posts

We are working with Parker on an endorsement deal because Wally loves the way the guitars play. On Friday before the show in Chicago Rusty, Derek and I were lucky enough to be able to to tour the Parker factory. We met with the artist relation guys and they wanted Wally to try a couple of their new models. Before sound check they brought two guitars and one bass (for Dave to try) and Wally was quite impressed with one of the guitars. It was a Parker with a front end of a strat and Wally really liked it. In fact, it was the first one off the US manufacturing line. We had planned to use it as either a back up or on one song (Should I Wait) but somehow unknowing to all this song was cut from the set list (an unavoidable mistake)so Wally never got to play it live. Dave really liked the bass (it is very light) but really did not have enough time to play with it to use it in a show. Who knows what the future holds. As time goes on maybe we will see more Parkers being used.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sorry I forgot to address the Epiphone. Yes it is a Les Paul Jr special that we use as a back up to the Parker. Normally, we would use the Flying V, but it has been tuned a little different for I'm a Rocker and it makes my life easier not having to re-tune the V for this song late in the show. It is a vintage guitar.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Roadie #3

I met you on New Year day during the sound check. I have to say that for one thing, I know absolutely nothing about what you are doing back stage or guitars, strings, amps, etc. but I have enjoyed your messages and find them very interesting. So this might seem like a dumb question, but I'm going to ask you anyway. On New Years day Eric was playing around with his Roland, he asked someone back stage what number it was on and I think they said 5. Eric said try 6 which they did and then 7 which they left it at. My question is what the heck can you do back stage to his Roland, on the other side of the room. Will, I told you it was probably a dumb question, and yes I know there is such a thing as wires, but I still haven't a clue to what possible "thing" could it be. Any ways it stuck in my head, how'd they do that??

Thanks, June happy

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hope this answers it

What I think you are referring to is when Eric could not hear the keyboard so the monitor mix technician had to make adjustments. You need to understand that none of the keyboards and acoustic guitars use amplifiers on stage therefore they are silent instruments. The outputs go directly to the mixing board and the sound is fed directly to the main sound system and back to the musicians through a monitor. Therefore, the only way a musician can hear what they are playing on the selected instrument is through the monitor mix (a speaker that normally look like a wedge sitting on the floor nearby or earbuds which we are not currently using). One issue is that the mix of instruments coming through the monitors along with everyone’s vocals has to be very precise, whereas the instruments do not overpower the vocals and vise versa. In the case that you described, I believe Eric could not hear enough of the keyboard so the increase in setting was made.

During shows the road crew constantly gets signals from everyone regarding what they can or can not hear in the monitor. Although we try to balance it at the sound check the room changes with 1,000 + people, the temperatures and just the excitement.

In all the years that I have done this work the monitors and the mix within has always been the hardest thing to control. Nothing frustrates and upsets a musician more than not being able to hear the monitors or feedback screaming back at them through the monitors.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I posted this on Raspberries.net and thought that some of the gear gang would enjoy the information.

And in the early days before electronic pianos we carried around a Kiwi upright piano and move it on and off the stage. The original sound system was a Shure Vocalmaster with 6 columns (three on each side) and a Shure 100 watt power amp booster. Those stack Marshall’s were ever so heavy. But some things never change. Today, Wally still plays three of the original guitars (Flying V, Double neck, and Rickenbacker) and Jim is playing the same set of drums (he bought them back a couple of years ago and had them recovered from the chrome finish to white marine pearl).

You can check out the drum set, both original and recovered HERE.

Pictures of Wally’s vintage guitars can be found HERE. ENJOY!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The heaviest amp---at least for its size--that I've have to deal with, is this one that Mesa/Boogie makes called the "Heartbreaker". Saw one on the store, and when I pulled on the handle, it was more like the "Backbreaker".

I feel sorry for any roadie in any band that has to deal with this amp....

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 7 months later...

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...