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Blender magazine, July 2006


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EC and WB: Come on , let's hug and make up. That was a long time ago and the fans know it was a hit. Eric loved it and the song helped launch Wally. It is what it is! GATW is one great , classic tune.Can we be friends?

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....I'm just glad we're now focused on a potential solo show. I'm not feeling the love bewtween EC and WB right now (evidenced by many posts both here and at .net) I'd be surprised if we ever catch them in the same room again, let alone playing another show!

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Don, I really wish I could embrace your take on Wally's comments, but "trite" is not a word I would ever associate with the "sound" of a recording. "Thin" or "tinny" or "gutless" or "lame" might refer to the sound, but"trite" would refer to "content." ...Wally never really liked the song, which is one reason why all the nonsense about him "co-writing" it seemed so disingenuous. ec

And so the story continues...

"Go All The Way" is still a very tough song to explain to people... & hearing/reading these comments from Wally & Eric about the record, just makes it even more interesting... despite the "bickering"....

I think it reflects the nature of the concept which was a revolutionary juxtaposing of pop and rock... AND in 197f'n2! People seem to forget what the zeitgeist of rock was and where trends had been since 1968 and where they were heading...

And since I always thought that Eric had to WORK to get his ideas across and to fruition with a ROCK BAND, it's not a surprise to hear this schism reappear...

If anything, Eric sounds like Elvis P on the verses (especially on one of the live boots I heard from '72 or '73)... using "Bing" as a reference just overstates the concept... (and probably Wally's discomfort with the way Eric sings "I never knew how complete love could be..." which to me is pure genius after the intro, but still a shock)

the "trite" remark isn't so far off base when one looks at what people were writing about in rock music... a song like "Go All The Way" immediately differentiates the 'Berries from all the boogie heads, progs, and anti-war hippies... it was also pretty far away from where their heroes (Kinks, Who, Lennon & McCartney, Beach Boys) were aesthetically at in 1972...

a song about teenage angst in 1972 by a rock band can easily be judged as trite when seen on paper... the genuis of Eric & the Berries & the producers, was that they pulled it off... it also sealed their fate... WAY TOO ahead of its time...

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Eric-I just got my copy of the July "Blender". I really think "Blender" would have sold many more copies if they put a picture of "Wally" on the cover-and put the picture and story of the "Pussy Cat Dolls" on the inside.

What do you think?-Ira.

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Ranking at #91 in Spin magazine's 1989 list of the 100 Greatest Singles Of All Time is Raspberries' "Go All The Way": http://www.rocklistmusic.co.uk/spin100.html#singles89

PauseandPlay.Com has been selecting singles for their rock vault time capusle for years now, and the 275th single picked for their time capsule is "Go All The Way": http://www.pauseandplay.com/vault.htm

Not bad for an oldie but goodie...

Don smile

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Zuke, Wally didn't "give" the riff to me. The chords, bass notes and rhythms that make up "the riff" were written by me on the piano. I knew I wanted "the riff" to be played with a guitar sound like "Won't Get Fooled Again" or "All Right Now." When I brought the song in, I asked Wally to play "the riff" on different frets (2nd, 5th, 7th etc) so I could hear what it would sound like in the different positions on the neck. When he played it in the position I liked best, I said "That's the one!" Wally played the daylights out of it! We did the same thing on "Tonight". I wrote the intro on the piano and then we transposed it to guitar. I even wrote "I Don't Know What I Want" on the piano! I've worked the same way with every session guitarist I've ever worked with from Hugh McCracken to Steve Lukather to Davey Johnstone to Andrew Gold.. Not one of them ever asked for a writing credit for working out a guitar part with me. ec

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Kay Bryson has posted a message from Wally on Raspberries.net at http://raspberries.net/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?p=4732#4732 and I think, for the sake of fairness (and this is a very fair group, I believe), that Wally's comments on the Blender article should also be read. Wally and Eric are both great guys, so arriving at the truth is a good thing.

I think people would be shocked at how much copy winds up cut from articles like the Blender story and how many quotes never make it into print, or are taken out of context (like Wally's four short sentences in the Blender piece). I know both Eric and Wally have been misquoted or taken out of context in published interviews over the years.

Having listened to Cheap Trick's great new "Rockford" album over-and-over for two weeks now, I know that *when* Eric and Wally return to the studio they will produce the best Raspberries album ever.

Happy Father's Day to Eric, Wally, the rest of the band and to all the Dads here, there, and everywhere ("...my old man says success is the measure...").

Don smile

Raspberries Forever!

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Just picked up the BLENDER magazine at Tower Records on Sunset (everytime I go there I see that photo in my head of the 'Berries posing in the store's parking lot :-) Anyway, the article is simply GREAT! I mean, the banner in big bold type at the top of the page saying, "THE GREATEST SONGS EVER" is advertising that money can't buy!

I'd also like to say that in context, Wally's quote doesn't offend so much as to segue into the bit about how the limiter saved the day in the studio. Still, I would have preferred it if Wally said something about how proud he is of the song, or how great it feels when so many people refer to the song's intro and how he played it as one of the greatest opening riffs of all-time, or…well, you get the idea.

I also love how Eric deftly turned the article into a story about rebellion and sexual innuendo -- something sure to pique the interest of BLENDER readers.

Bernie

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I bought it, but haven't read it yet, but any press for the band is good press.

I buy the magazine every month (I dont know why I just dont subscribe as I've been buying it issue to issue for like 3 years now) I have a sorta love/hate feeling for it. I love some of the features in it, but sometimes they can make some uncalled for snide comments about some musicians. Also, if they feature one more pic of Paris friggin' Hilton I'm gonna go off the deep end!!!!

Jeff

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Given the history of all that has gone before, it's easy to read things into someone's comments, especially in a magazine article. I'm sure it's easiest for both Wally and Eric to read things into each other's comments, considering all the water under the bridge/over the dam, etc.

That said, I have never known ANYONE who liked a magazine interview they've done, after they've done it. The interviewer/reporter takes bits and pieces and sometimes things don't even come out the way people said them, certainly usually not the way they were meant. Hell, my boss quotes me as saying things I never said to my class on my evaluations in school!

After reading Don's direct quote from the article, I don't interpret Wally as saying anything negative--it sounds like he's recounting how "frustrated" Eric, he and everyone else were as regards putting the song down the way it should sound. I haven't read Wally's comments on Raspberries.net yet, but I will.

Another thing Don has perfect is that *whatever* Eric and Wally do together is magic. Writing, singing, playing, THINKING MUSICALLY, whatever! Although they are different from each other in ways, in some ways, especially musically and creatively, they often think alike, are both strong personalities and both have brilliant ideas. The biggest thing is that they do love and respect, along with exasperating, each other.

And Don's right--there's no doubt that this band can overcome anything. Because they know what they have is out of sight, and worth it.

smile --Darlene

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Just catching up on this interesting thread. And I agree with:

* LOBSTERLVR. I had the same thought you did even before I read your comment: Every time Manny Ramirez of the Red Sox does something that's quirky, or raises eyebrows, they say, "That's just Manny being Manny." He still goes out and hits 45 HRs, so they love him and overlook the curiosities. That's my take on that Wally quote: It's just Wally being Wally. You've still gotta love the guy and his immense talents. That said, I also agree with...

* DON K. Heck, I've been an editor and writer for 25 years, and I know how easy it is to take an interview passage, extract just the right sentence, and get the speaker to sound like he's saying something that's "off," or that doesn't reflect his real meaning. I'm like you, Don: I'd want to read the entire interview transcript to see Wally's context. That one sentence couldn't have constituted the entire interview---if it did, the writer's not a very good interviewer! Wally may have raved about the song for 10 minutes (he probably did, if I could speculate) but had that one "counter" point in his dialog. The writer pounced on it and voila!---he's got Wally sounding like he's trashing "Go All the Way," which makes better copy than a rave. (This is, after all, a People magazine society--- unfortunately) And I just ain't buying it. "GATW" put Raspberries and him on the map. Wally's gotta be proud of it....

* ERIC. "Trite" is a word to describe content, not sound quality. And there's no way "trite" describes "Go All the Way." Wrong word... but I think everybody got the idea (which DonK so eloquently stated in quoting a variety of sources from Bernie's/Ken's book).

* TONY C. The contrast within the song --- rock'n'roll and pop balladry side-by-side --- is what makes it stand out. Timeless. Totally timeless.

* BERNIE. For Blender to feature "GATW" in its GREATEST SONGS series... well, that rocks. Blender's got a decent circulation that's gotta include a lot of djs, music writers, etc., who are reminded of that classic song.

* DARLENE. Never mind the little skirmishes here and there. Raspberries together is magic. Encore!

I DON'T agree with Zuke's classification of "GATW" as a "mellow" song. Of course, I don't know what else you're listening to, Zuke. If you just finished a marathon Iron Maiden listening session with the volume at 11, well, okay. But mellow? Mellow is Olivia Newton John and Barry Manilow and "You Light Up My Life."

--LC

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Eric,

So Sorry.

Then all that nonsense about writing credits WAS NONSENSE. You wrote it. You da man.

Case Closed.

Zuke

_______________________________________________

LC,

I know the intro ROCKS and the middle SCREAMS, but the verse (all one sentence of it) and the chorus (that takes up most of the song) are so melodic and harmonic, for all intents and purposes make it a mellow song in comparison to the intro.

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It's clear the song is not "trite" and look how well it has stood the test of time. Even rockers, who erroneously thought Raspberries were a "teenage girl group," have tremendous respect for this song. It still sounds fresh and alive.The word "clever" always comes to mind when I think of this song. It's very clever songwriting filled with nice twists and surprises. And ofcourse it rocks to no end. I always thought Wally might have influenced rocking up the orginal arrangement but thats only conjecture and the product of reading different snipets here and there. In retrospect, as a fan, I wish the song would have been credited "Carmen-Bryson" just so maybe some bad feelings weren't generated over something so good, so positive. I mean, afterall, Lennon and McCartney sure extended the notion of being benificent when it came to songwriting credits. Regardless, I hope both Eric and Wally look back proudly on all that work, and how much it has endured and meant to people for so many years. the song never ceases to amaze me. Rock on.

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The Beatles were a complete fluke of the universe. Every planet in the cosmos lined up right for them. To think that John and Paul, two of the most brilliant songwriters in a generation, were born in the same town within a couple of years of each other, had similar ambitions, complimentary writing styles, were equally prolific and managed to find each other is just incredible. The fact that George Harrison lived nearby, unbelievable. That they ended up in the studio with George Martin, beyond belief. That they got to ride the wave of technology from 2 track, to 4, to 8, to 16, to 24, and had unlimited funding to sit in the recording studio and experiment with their classically trained, genius producer ,incomprehensible. For every great song John came up with, Paul wrote one that was just as good. That's why their "arrangement" over writing credits worked. ec

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The Beatles were a complete fluke of the universe. Every planet in the cosmos lined up right for them. To think that John and Paul, two of the most brilliant songwriters in a generation, were born in the same town within a couple of years of each other, had similar ambitions, complimentary writing styles, were equally prolific and managed to find each other is just incredible. The fact that George Harrison lived nearby, unbelievable. That they ended up in the studio with George Martin, beyond belief. That they got to ride the wave of technology from 2 track, to 4, to 8, to 16, to 24, and had unlimited funding to sit in the recording studio and experiment with their classically trained, genius producer ,incomprehensible. For every great song John came up with, Paul wrote one that was just as good. ec

ABSOLUTELY ABSOLUTELY PERFECT SUMMARY OF THE BEATLES!!!!!!! You should copyright this quote... also: for some reason, Ringo's inclusion is also freakish too... i've seen too many bands without the "right" drummer and/or comic foil... the fact that they sought him out and got him is par for their magic streak...
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Ditto, Piers! Eric, you've captured the magic of the Fab Four brilliantly. Every piece of the puzzle was in place. Take out just one of those elements, and it wouldn't be the same....

Earlier today, I had the Beatles 8-volume DVD playing because the song "Rain" was running through my head (small wonder, living in New England these days). I just had to see the video of "Rain," and after that, I backtracked to watch the Shea Stadium concert footage.... When you watch the absolute frenzy of the fans as the Beatles launched into "I Feel Fine," well, it's goosepimples. And watching the interplay of the band is so revealing.... John had the air of "leader" during that Shea Stadium show -- out front and singing lead on the first two Shea Stadium songs the DVD presents, and Paul and George were right in line with those great harmony vocals, not to mention their bass and guitar playing (love George's lead on "I Feel Fine")....

After that, I watched the DVD's live performance of "Nowhere Man" --- ragged but absolutely right. What a great song. It's been ringing in my head all day.

Can't get enough of the Beatles... or Raspberries. Seriously, 90% of what I've been listening to the past few years has been Beatles, Beach Boys, and Raspberries.... You could say I'm "caught in a time warp."

Anyway, Eric, thanks for your bit on the Beatles. And I'm glad you got that Manny reference. (I think I got your reply, too... Clever!)

Best,

Larry

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holy crap...

i was in the middle of reading this thread for the first time tonight (at 1:15am, as I couldn't fall to sleep), and then guess what song comes on my oldies radio station here in syracuse?

yup. you guessed it. the aforementioned pop hit reviewed in 'blender'.

chills.

i love when things like this happen!

but when keith's "98.6" comes on after...that's when i want to go back to bed.

yawn...zzzzzzz

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As for the Beatles, there aren't that many coincidences in the universe...it was absolutely meant to happen. I believe that some things/people have a certain magnetism for others: call it seeking one's own level of talent/genius, or recognizing it when it is anywhere within the limits of even a large city--or country--but some people are just meant to "find each other." True in the case of the Beatles, true in the case of Raspberries.

smile --Darlene

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