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Eric Carmen meets the Minions! IHOP Ad


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I was doing other tasks with the Food Network show(s) playing on TV in the background, when all of a sudden I heard the unmistakable soaring vocals of Eric Carmen on "Hungry Eyes" being used in the new Minions/Gru movie ads that tie in with IHOP! I hope EC gets a pile of money with a performer's cut of the broadcast rights! 😉 

 

 

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The rights to a song, and the compensation for its use, are divided into two parts: the rights to use the composition and the rights to the particular performance itself. So, yes, Eric gets paid for this commercial. Had the advertising agency used a sound-alike singer and re-recorded the tune, only the songwriter would get paid a royalty.

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On 6/27/2022 at 5:53 AM, Raspbernie said:

The rights to a song, and the compensation for its use, are divided into two parts: the rights to use the composition and the rights to the particular performance itself. So, yes, Eric gets paid for this commercial. Had the advertising agency used a sound-alike singer and re-recorded the tune, only the songwriter would get paid a royalty.

Thank you, Bernie, for that explanation! 👍  I made a logical leap when posting this thread in the first place that EC might indeed have a $take in this nationwide ad! 💲 

While my husband Jay and I run a smallish "niche" music publishing company with a worldwide reach in the a cappella scene, our focus is generally on print rights (i.e. sheet music for ensembles to use legally), performance rights (concerts), and mechanical (tangible media - albums,CDs, etc.) & streaming rights. My husband has written jingles, etc. used for TV commercials (NBC "Must See TV" national campaign. His longtime barbershop quartet champ buddy John Miller just retired from NBC network after a very long and marketing-industry-respected career - John was THE NBC guy onsite at every single the Olympics IBC going back a couple decades calling the shots on all the Olympics promo ads - John used to throw some of these NBC jingle gigs to Jay whenever he could! 😉 and a lot of local Chicago ads during the time when we still lived in the greater Chicagoland area) , but they were generally works-for-hire (i.e. one-time payment for his time/compositional effort) for which he was not paid broadcast royalties. Then again, Jay and his Chicago Chord of Trade quartet buddies were roped into filling in about 15 seconds of musical vocals for a dog food commercial due to the tenor singer's personal connection with a production studio owner in Chicago. That commercial went nationwide and they all got some pretty serious broadcast royalty revenue - hahaha - go figure!  A gig is a gig, as they say! 😎

The first JDM "retirement" was really a sidestep into a whole new massive global gig really: 

https://deadline.com/2010/06/its-official-top-nbc-marketing-exec-john-miller-to-exit-at-the-end-of-the-year-48335/

But now JDM has officially retired (and I know his wife Sharon is beyond thrilled - they never went on any vacations in the last 20+ years - while she had great seats at the various Olympics venues, she barely saw her husband the entire time they were there! 😉 

https://marketshare.tvnewscheck.com/2022/05/26/john-miller-legendary-nbc-tv-marketing-guru-retiring-after-43-years/

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On 6/27/2022 at 5:53 AM, Raspbernie said:

The rights to a song, and the compensation for its use, are divided into two parts: the rights to use the composition and the rights to the particular performance itself. So, yes, Eric gets paid for this commercial. Had the advertising agency used a sound-alike singer and re-recorded the tune, only the songwriter would get paid a royalty.

So, if they used Celine Dion's version of All by Myself, he would have received nothing. Is this accurate??

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23 minutes ago, Vinnie B Trask said:

So, if they used Celine Dion's version of All by Myself, he would have received nothing. Is this accurate??

No, because EC owns 85% of the compositional rights; Rachmaninoff Estate controls 15% compositional rights, so he would get the compositional rights royalties in that situation but not the performer rights.

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1 hour ago, Helen G said:

No, because EC owns 85% of the compositional rights; Rachmaninoff Estate controls 15% compositional rights, so he would get the compositional rights royalties in that situation but not the performer rights.

But he sold his composition rights and publishing in 2018

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