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Naive Southerner


Bessieboo

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What I am curious about what you DO in the winter.

How do you shop and do errands when it is icy and snowing?

Do you still do outdoor activities?

Do you miss blue skies and light?

Are kids playing sports? It is soccer and winter baseball season here.

I enjoy visiting family in Upstate NY in the winter. We Ski, snowmobile, skate...things that are unavailable to us in the south.

But it is a vacation, not real life

Educate a poor southern girl smile

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I'm having a bit of the opposite problem, Bessie. I moved from Colorado to Maryland, and while my "real life" in winter has always been skiing, skating, hopping on a snowmobile, etc, NOW, I'm wondering just what TO DO in all the warmer weather we've been having here !! confused

p.s...the sun really DOES shine in the winter, too. happy

It is the most beautiful time of year to me...when there's fresh snow on the mountains and lots of sunshine, everything just sparkles !

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Bessie,

I think many people all over the USA dash out to the store at the first suggestion of bad weather. I've lived in the South, and in the North, and the Southerners would easily outpace a Northerner to the store. Literally I would hear car doors slamming and tires squealing!

People, especially children, will find a way to amuse themselves no matter what the climate. Extreme northerners will have cars that can ably handle snow, and in general the roads are plowed and salted fairly rapidly --so it's not as much of a handicap as you might think. As far as the cold temperature --well, your body adapts.

And a New Hampshire blue sky in the winter? Beautiful beyond description - especially the clean air.

Anne

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You know what I do during the Winter, find things to do with my vegetables,Lol, lol

Then I strain my eyes to see better through all the snowflakes.

Then I go nuts, because I cannot enjoy the out doors without having to use the washroom.

I go to the mall and look at all the LCD televisions and new electronics, computers, printers, web-cams, oh by the way, soon I will make a guest appearance on you tube,ok

I want to have fun.

And see how photo genic I really am.

I will let you know,ok

So, their you go my friends things to do during Winter,Lol

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Actually my first few winters in the great northwest are nowhere near as xtreme as I would have anticipated. Despite El Nino and all that, there is rarely more than a skiff of snow on the ground.

Now I will admit that these past three years I've been gone from here as much as I've been here, maybe more. And every time I leave I hear about how much it snowed and how cold it got, but thus far this winter (and I've been home since the first week of December) I've touched the snow shovel one time. I've spent more days outside without my jacket than with.

I'm sure that one of these weeks or years I'll see the two or three feet of snow I've heard about coming from a major storm, but thus far in my life I've faced worse storms while driving a truck cross-country than I have while sitting in this neck of the woods.

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Mr E

I meant "Naive" as in- "Lacking worldly experience and understanding".

But Native work just fine for me as well.

I thought of your winters like our summers. With the right preparation it is no big deal.

In the summer, if we have a big storm and lose power we have a generator to keep the fridge going and some fans to keep cool.

As for the heat, the hottest I have ever seen here was 96 degrees.

Yes, that's hot - but it rains every afternoon by 3:00 to cool it off.

I have been in hotter weather in North Dakota, Washington,DC and Canada. With no AC.

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You just basically deal with it. Being a nurse, basically you have to be there no matter what. I've driven in 12 inches of snow before the plows come through (and my husband works for a municipality road department, so he plows snow in the winter). I snow blow the driveway (Thank God for the invention of the snowblower!) The only time you worry is an ice storm, because like Oklahoma and Missouri right now, it doesn't come on really quickly. You learn not to fall on your butt and look like and idiot.

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Kathy - you're too funny! I read your response to a couple of friends and they loved it. hahahaha I've never seen as much snow and ice as this winter. There are so many things to do up here to stay busy inside and out...I like sledding, watching the northern lights at night, snowshoe hiking, going to the Hot Springs, watching dog sled races, ECHL hockey and college basketball games, and we have a great symphony and opera here. To break up the monotony of the season, for two weeks in February we have a winter carnival called Fur Rendezvous, which has all sorts of artsy and sports competitions, auctions, and concert performances. As soon as that ends, the Iditarod begins, followed by weekend after weekend of boat shows, gun shows, and sportsmans shows where we can either dream or spend every last penny on something fun for summer.

To keep from being affected by the darkness, I make sure I get outside as much as I can during whatever hours the sun is shining, and I take D3-5 (vitamin D). I just got a mag trainer for my mountain bike, so now I can ride inside during the winter. Staying active makes it easier to get through the darkest days.

Driving around isn't really a problem. Most people have either all-season radials, studded tires or 4WD. We just have to plan a little extra time to get places because there's usually a snow plow or disabled vehicle holding up traffic somewhere along the way, and also slow down and keep more distance from the cars ahead in case we have trouble stopping.

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To Kathy's point: I remember a few February's ago when we were visiting my in-laws in Metuchen, NJ, and there had been a snowfall of about 5 inches. Now most Canadians wouldn't blink at 5 inches of snow. Kristy and I made our way to Menlo Park shopping mall, and I swear that there couldn't have been more than a handful of people in that entire huge mall, AND, most of the stores were closed because the workers didn't make it in.

Marv

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Tehachapi- Land of 4 Seasons.

That's what the sign says as you drive up the mountain. What they don't mention is that you can experience all 4 seasons in one day! Town elevation is 4000 feet- mostly rolling grass hills and oak trees- moderated by Socal weather patterns (only 2 hours from L.A.). The locals have a saying- if you don't like the weather, wait 20 minutes, it's likely to change. Used to drive Subies all the time up there. Kirk.

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Down here in Winter we put rain coats on and carry on. Only in the lower half of the South Island is there snow to contend with and that affects the farmers rather than the rest of the population.

Boys play soccer, rugby and ride their BMX bikes through the puddles. The girls watch them.. :P

Muzza cool

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You know, I lived in Columbus, MS for nine months in 1992. In mid-January it snowed one day. Big HUGE beautiful snowflakes came down. They had all of three inches by 8:30 a.m. It had to be a blizzard! They sent all of the kids home from school, businesses closed, even the grocery stores were locked up tight by 10:00 a.m. Around 10:30 a.m. the sun came out. By noon all the evidence of snow in Columbus had completely disappeared... and nothing reopened until the next day! It was crazy.

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Based on years of seeing what happens in grocery stores at the first hint of snow (and never mind that the DC area rarely gets enough snow to cause anybody to be stuck in their house for more than a day or so)...I've concluded that everyone stays home and makes French toast! All of the bread, eggs, and milk disappear from the shelves immediately, so I just assume it's for French toast.........

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Bessie,

A few "Yankees" I know have generators, but most don't. Power outages usually don't last for long, so we all find ways to deal with it.

When I lived in MI, we had outages every year. Usually we spent time with neighbors, some went to the movies (if it was hot) or the shopping mall (if it wasn't affected). Some had to go to the health club for showers (they had well water which doesn't work well w/o power...), but that was a severe year --usually when the power goes out it's only for 3-4 hrs or so.

A few times I hung out with the utility guys as they tried to figure out where the problem was. They have great stories, great tools, and it's a lot of fun to climb around inside their vehicles (yep, they were left unattended...).

And, no, folks don't usually race to the grocery store with a power outage!

Anne

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I can't say that I enjoy the snow like I used to. After living in San Antonio for 15 years I got used to the warm weather and was glad that I only spent about 2 weeks during the winter holidays in Cleveland, that was more than enough snow to keep me happy for another year.

As far as being on the road with the crew "cold weather sucks" You get out of a warm truck and unload road cases that are frozen, everything needs to thaw before you can start to work. Then when it comes time to load out you are nice and warm and you have to fight cold once again. I really don't mind the cold, but when the wind is blowing there is nothing worse.

But as Eric said "I'm not in it for the money"

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In January 1998, we went through an unbelieveable ice storm in Montreal. Freezing rain coated everything in glassy ice, making all forms of transportation treacherous.

As the storm continued, layers of ice built up, weighing down power lines and poles, and causing massive power outages.

More than 3 million people were without power in Quebec and 1.5 million in Eastern Ontario. About 100,000 people went into shelters.

Power was restored in most urban areas in a matter of days, but many rural communities suffered for much longer. Three weeks after the beginning of the storm, there were still 700,000 people without power.

It was really something to behold and even the amazing pictures that were taken during the time don't do the experience true justice.

I was able to find this link to some pictures:

http://travel.webshots.com/album/21052889WwXdaGHHOO

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