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chris hess

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</font><blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><hr /><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">Originally posted by Tony Cartmill:

<strong> She's starting to make sense. We must find a way to silence her before other inferior white woman catch on to our scam.

Anybody have a gift card to Macy's and some chocolate?... insane

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Just on the Race subject ... and yes I accept some responsibility for the subject almost getting lost...but it has been announced here in New Zealand that our Maori people are now outnumbered by people of Chinese descent. This includes people from Cambodia, Thailand, Malaysia etc.

Now that has a couple of potential implications. One is related to the differing cultural lifestyles they bring and therefore their perception of how they should live and behave here. The other is from a political point of view their vote will now outweigh the Maori vote which could have a considerable impact on the "face" of New Zealand politics in the future.

Of course the third possibility is a backlash that could be racially motivated and already we are seeing the influence of the triads here.

Muzza cool

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Hi Chris. Yeah... I have to plead guilty to having a little fun along the way. We did think about Race though. confused And we even talked about it a bit angrylaugh And I think that hatred toward others for whatever reason is a sad indictment on society and people. Getting on with EVERYONE seems to be a dream we all wish would come true. Making it happen seems to be further down the list of priorities for many though.

Muzza cool

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I think there has been progress made in how race is viewed in society. But I see two things that always keep things where they were --- individuals and events.

When my mother (white) married my step-father (Chinese) in 1969 this was virtually unheard of. To make matters worse, this was during the Vietnam era and no one looked at it as Chinese, or Japanese, or Vietnamese. They viewed it as Asian... a white woman was traitorous marrying an Asian man during that time. (Much the way society looks at all Muslims since 9/11.) We grew up very isolated in our neighborhood as the only mixed family around. This stuff runs so deep that my step-father, after having to face this prejudice himself, did not think my husband and I should or could marry because he was Catholic and I was Protestant! Well, we married, as did each of my siblings who also all have mixed marriages/relationships!

Now, all these years later, I'm still part of a mixed family as my two youngest are black. We don't face so much from "society" anymore but still face the individuals who don't approve. We've lost friends who wrote letters of character reference for us to become foster parents... and then abandoned us after insulting us saying that we had no right adopting "those kids that belong with their own kind." Most people who meet them (or us as a family) think nothing of it. But of course they still face prejudice by individuals at the Y or in stores where they're followed around to see if "the black kids are going to steal anything." Society may be growing up but there will always be individuals who want to hate.

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The sitcom, "30 Rock" addresses race issues all the time, from the "White Guilt Overcompensation" to the "Blacks Scorned for Talking Too White" back to the "You Can Talk Urban Street Language Sometimes and Still Be Smart, Successful and a Decent Family Man"...

A little smartly written humor can help get serious points across...

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proved me wrong? i do'nt think so..hahaha!! lots of comic relief..nothing wrong w/that,i just thought i would bring a serious subject up to my friends here..you are all GOOD,SMART people here and i respect you all..it's time to make a difference,and it starts here!! "you may say i'm a dreamer,but i'm not the only one"..think about it..lol,chris

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The thing about ‘race’ issues is, it’s fine and dandy to all want a world where people live in harmony and peace with their brothers and sisters, and I’m sure most people are in accord on this point, and do their best to present positive values. However, unless you are a non-Caucasian or a visible minority, you really don’t know what it is like. You can say that you understand, but the reality is you really don’t understand.

Marv

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People who aren't mentally retarded, who don't have a terminal illness, who haven't been through a divorce, who haven't fought in a war, who haven't lost a limb, who haven't had a child die, who haven't been falsely convicted of a crime, who haven't been cheated on by their spouse...

People who haven't experienced these things and the thousands of other trials that humans go through maybe don't understand these trials to the same extent as the afflicted does, but those that try, DO UNDERSTAND the pain and injustice...and ought to be commended for trying to understand and empathize. Empathizing should not be equated with pandering. Sometimes when one cares/empathizes their conclusions about a solution might involve hard medicine...and won't involve any patronizing.

If you think caucasians can't understand bigotry, then have the caucasians you have in mind come live on the south side of Chicago for a spell. I lived in Hyde Park for 6 years. Hyde Park is a racially mixed community of mostly whites and blacks. I loved living there, and still get the community newspaper. One of the reasons I loved living there was because of the diversity...and I viscerally am drawn to the black community.

But I experienced several incidents of overt racism during this period. And I guarantee you that no black male in this community experienced the same degree of racism from whites as I experienced from blacks. These racial assaults didn't affect my attitude as I knew the perpetrators were not representative of the black community as a whole...and I'd generally just smile them off. But it confirmed to me that there is at least as much racism in the black community as there is in the white community...and I'd purport that there's actually more.

There are many people in this world who have been dealt an unfair hand of cards. Those suffering from racial prejudice are just one small fraction of this group. The last thing any "afflicted" group ought to be doing is haranguing those who attempt to empathize with their plight..

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James you've posted some intelligent comments. I cannot refute your statements, but let me say that even though you might be a minority in your own community, beyond that area are you treated any differently or treated with racisim?

My point is, when you’re part of what is considered a visible minority, generally speaking, you are looked at differently (especially post-9/11), you are treated differently, and racial profiling/stereotyping is what you come to expect.

Marv

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