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Guitar playing help


okstevens

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I bought a guitar I got the fever... now how do I play? I bought a guitar a few years back and at 50 or so got discouraged, had some fun, got discouraged, then played very little. Now I'm trying to make more time to learn but without formal lessons. Anyway, a couple of buddies came over last night to help. And as the pattern goes, had some fun, got discouraged. They were doing a count rather than saying the chords. Like 1-3-5 etc. Kind of got a taste of what they were doing but more lost than found on it. Anyone shine a light on this for me or suggest a good book/video?

My history in the rock industry hinges on your answer!

Thanks,

Jeff

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Hollies, I can play G,C and D with some efficiency but I don't get the 1-3-5 thing that they are doing. Instead of yelling out the chords they were yelling out the numbers. Any ideas for some G,C,D chords songs? I bought two Eric song books and anyone who thinks these guys play simple music are crazy. I just about threw out my guitar when I seen his chord selections. I don't think there is a G,C,or D in the whole mix!

Thanks.

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I would not use that 1-3-5 system...just practice the chords...You can simplify any song to basic chords...but you'll want to learn the barre chords. There are 'Tab' sites on the internet to get the chords to almost any popular song. Raspberries songs do have alot of changes...but with practice you'll be able to play most of them. Just not as well as Wally.

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Thanks again for the info. Glad to hear that the 1-3-5 etc is not a mandatory function to play guitar. Practice I shall! I loved the "Just not as good as Wally." You appreciate the talent of Wally and Eric after you try to move your fingers to a chord position in less than 20 minutes. Thank God for the distortion button as well a bottle of Jack Daniels!

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Learn on your acoustic guitar, ok....it doesn't lie and it will help you develop calluses on your fingertips and increase your hand and wrist strength. Stay away from that distortion and electric in the beginning. Remember....you have to crawl before you can walk and you have to walk before you can run. Don't get discouraged. Just keep moving forward...even if you think you are not making any progress....you are.

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Thanks Steve.....I always remembered what Keith Richards said...he said he never touches an electric guitar until The Stones start rehearsing for a new tour. It's acoustic all the way until that time. I would say Keith knows what he's talking about! lol

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also get a printout of the notes of the neck up to the 12th fret(1 octave) and memorize them..note no seperation (spacing,or fret) between b-c,and e-f...then learn your sharps and flats..e and b are always flats..this is important to know this and will really help starting out..most of all,have fun,do'nt get frustrated..if you do,give it a rest,then comeback and try again..there are simple finger excercises too you can do like a walking bass line..this gets all the fingers involved and will help develop some rhymn also..lol,chris

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www.discoverguitaronline.com is a pretty neat spot and can provide some assistance when needed. The advice on playing the acoustic first & then moving to electric is excellent. Especially if the acoustic has fairly heavy strings. When you move to an electric with lighter gauge strings, your fingers will fly when you get to the point of playing solos.

One more tip ... as boring as it may be, practice scales in all keys. Up, down, backwards forwards. Incredibly boring, but again, when you advance to the point of playing solos, you'll be surprised at how well you can create when you know what notes from a scale will fit in the current key you're playing in. When you're first starting out, it can become extremely frustrating. It took me forever to get my fingers to lay in the right position so I could play a clean bar "F" chord. Perserverance my man, perserverance. Good Luck!

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I would not use that 1-3-5 system...just practice the chords...You can simplify any song to basic chords...but you'll want to learn the barre chords. There are 'Tab' sites on the internet to get the chords to almost any popular song. Raspberries songs do have alot of changes...but with practice you'll be able to play most of them. Just not as well as Wally.

The 1-3-5 they're talking about is part of the "nashville numbering system". It's extremely easy to learn and makes the charts a breeze to work with. Once they have the "key" decided (which is a bunch of finger gestures ... THAT can get interesting) the chords are given numbers. The "1" chord in the key of C is "C". The "4" chord in the key of C is "F". The "5" chord is "G" and so on. If your in the key of C, a 1-3-5 would be C, E, and G. If your in the key of A, a 1-3-5 would be A, C & E. There's more to it, but these are the basics of it. Hope that helps. As someone stated before, you need to crawl before you walk, walk before you run, etc. This is something to learn down the line. laugh
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Great advice everyone. I think I get the number system now but still don't see the benefit but I guess that will come down the line. I'll just start picking away now and develop some blisters and with a little luck a little talent as well ( I hope) Again thanks to all!

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I can recall Eric (in Bernies' wonderful "Marathon Man"),telling how the professional rock guitarists from Ringo's All-Starr band complained about his songs having a chord change for every word!!!They weren't accustomed to working that hard!!!That is why I consider Eric "The Professor" of pop/rock music!!!His final exams are killers!!!

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remember the doe ray me's(sp??!!)..crucial if you follow that way..i personally never learned that system when i started playing guitar,i started on chords too,then developed ryhtmn,then started a go at riffs,then lead playing..everyone is different on their own approach,some get it,some do'nt,in other words,what works for you,stick with it!! enjoy..lol,chris

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Take your time...remember its not a race. learn at your own pace.LISTEN to what you play.Even single notes.learn "voicings"by ear.(learn what an open e, and a fretted e sound like.(same note, different voicing....)a little each day, and always finish your rehearsal on something you learned previously....

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.....there is only one answer..."practice, practice and practice"....the 1-3-5 or the "c, F, G" action is secondary to playing, playing and playing...it takes at least one full year of learning every day...chord by chord...it is brutal ont he fingers, extremely frustrating for the first 8 months...then 4 months of going..."hey!!! I did it!!!"...then you can start playing full songs with some degree of satisfaction...it doesn't come easy, but worth it in the end...

bahoo

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What I did wayback when I started learning is get a guitar book with a variety of songs. The chord changes usually are represented with a diagram showing the fingering. Find a simple song with maybe 1 chord you havent mastered yet and learn and practice. Do this a bit at a time and you'll know a lot of chords and songs before you know it. Learn a new chord and use it to write your own song.

Big suggestion since you know G-C-D learn e minor next. It only takes 2 fingers and G-em-C-D will let you play a lot of songs from the 50's.

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beware of songs that are printed in the wrong key..alot out there!!! i remember when i was younger and used my money to buy some of the beatles stuff,and more than half of them were wrong..i thought i was goin' nuts or my ears were goin' nuts when i played them!!! lol,chris

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welcome johnny! but alot of people do'nt get that..many artistic people(including myself!!) do'nt get that part of it..and usually do better in art and music than the math part of the circle of fifths..i learned most everything by ear,but then again,i struggled thru math all my school life..that side of my brain (math) was horrible,but yet the "artsy" side ...no problem at all,i connected totally with it..in other words,some people get that method,others do'nt...all advice is welcome here!!! very good topic here!!..lots of love..chris

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