Jump to content

Age of Peak Creativity


VAB5

Recommended Posts

Great topic,You can look at in terms of athletic statistics also. It seems as though time goes on, guys get less experimental or perhaps open to possibilities. That can be said of all of us. But you really notice pop musicians falling back to more standard chord progressions as they get older I think. I think McCartney,Lennon, Townsend etc. are good examples of this. You dont see so much of the unexpected in terms of melody or chord changes.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Perhaps your production is greatest when you're hungry. Mid 20's, starting to rack up bills, and coming to the juncture of sh*t or get off the pot, make it in music/author etc. or bag it for a real job. Besides the pressures, angst, decisons, etc. probably make great writing fodder, as opposed to financially set, family set, etc.

Just speculation from a fan, a search on ascap doesn't turn up my name so what do I know.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

By those definitions...And by my own admission...It's way too late for me to even harbor the slightest dream of being a famous musical performer...I can however hang on the dream of maybe someday writing a lyric or melody that will find an audience somewhere...But even then the odds are pretty high against me...Once you get out of your 20's the world of music is not going to look at you to write the next Humongous hit record...(unless you've already written hits when you were younger)...As far as my creativity goes...I can do much more with it than when i was in my teens or twenties...I didn't even seriously consider writing a melody until my late 30's when i just said "what the hell" nobody is gonna do this for me...So i might as well give it a whack"...So i found out late that i could do that.

...Is anything i've ever written or ever gonna write going to be hit worthy?...Who knows?...There are a millions of people in the world writing songs...And most of them will never make it farther than the songwriters home town...Which is the state of success i am blessed with now...But it's still cool to bring my buddy Ed into the radio studio with me and perform a few of 'em live on the air...So i consider myself lucky in that respect...Most songwriters don't get to do something like that...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

People have probably done masters thesis on this topic, but the answer is really so subjective - creativity happens at different stages of our lives and it peaks at some point before when we stop putting an effort into developing it. Frances Scott Key wrote Star Spangled Banner when he was 35 and he was a lawyer by profession. Grandma Moses was still painting incredible pictures at 101. Who's to say if Ernest Hemingway's A Farewell to Arms published when he was 30 is more creative than For Whom The Bell Tolls around age 40 or 41, or even The Old Man and the Sea finished when he as 50 or 51? Barry Mann and Cynthia Weil haven't seemed to "peak" yet - they're in their late 60's, and everything they write surpasses everything they wrote before. I think Steve is right that our lives get interrupted by responsibilities and activities like working to pay the bills, and our untapped creative juices are still there to use when we retire or finally make the time. I know it's cliche, but "Age is just a number", "You're not dead yet", and "The best is yet to come."

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well, even alot of Hemingway scholars think "For Whom the Bell Tolls" and "Islands in the Stream" are lame compared to "Sun Also Rises" and "A Farewell to Arms." Ofcourse its subjective but also arguable that theres an "edginess" and depth found in the earlier works that didnt exist in the later ones.

Totally agree though, "Old Man and the Sea" shows you can still reach the heights later on. Sorta like the Raspberries reunion tour.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I love this subject. Judging from my own experience, 27 is the age when one is mature enough to understand what's going on, but hasn't lost one's romantic sense of changing the world. 27 is probably the age at which one feels most empowered to "set the world on fire," and hasn't the foggiest notion of a qualm about getting burned.

With that in mind, it's amazing what Eric and Raspberries had achieved/gone through by the time Eric was 25 (1974). In that year, I reached 27 and began my idee fixe that the original band had to get back together, all the while cheering on Eric's solo career. I never got over my 27 year-old optimism on that score (though I may have lost some of it about other things in life), and here we are. The power of creative thought at that time of life is awe-inspiring and I believe it has the power to move mountains, if one holds onto it through the years.

That said, don't despair if you're long past 27. It's *never* too late. I have to say that there are some benefits to maturity I never anticipated: one gets braver as the years go on and, as I've told my boss many times, there is NO substitute for experience. Some people have created their greatest achievements in later life: my inspiration is...GRANDMA MOSES. (Don't laugh, Tony!) She *began* painting at the age of *70* and was still painting at 100 years of age.

Now, *that's* inspiration!

Given the band's brilliant history and the complete and unqualified admiration they have garnered from big names in the music industry at their ability to perform even better *now* than they did "back when" (and who else can do *that*?!!!), I would say the Berries' best years are ahead of them. And, life being what it is with *connections* to other things, the best years of Eric's musical endeavors also lie ahead of him in my view. Great talent will always be recognized when you put it out there. And they *are* putting it out there, and getting noticed. My creative optimism on those scores is *still* only 27 years old. :)

:) --Darlene

Link to comment
Share on other sites

To EC's point (Fitzgerald), another interesting subtheme to all this is when young artists make a tremendous leap in their vision or abilities from one piece of work to the next. Fitzgeralds jump from 1923 to 1925(Gatsby) is incredible and stands as one of the great examples. One can speak of the Beatles transition to Rubber Soul and Revolver. There a million examples, but its really quite interesting to examine what may occured in the lives or abilities of the young artist to create such profound statements from previously less-profound statements.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Some of MY best postings on ec.com were when I was 27 That was some 28 years ago.Anyone remember my brilliant dissection of Mac Davis' "Baby Baby Don't Get Hooked On Me"? I also created quite a stir when I likened "Baby I Want You To Want Me" by "Lobo" to Ray Charles' "You Don't Know Me" and found that the "Wolf's'version was the one that would stand the test of time.If I had known then-what I know now I would have finished my book "Jan And Dean The REAL Men Behind Pet Sounds" and I woulda been a rock press icon of Jan Wennerian proportions.Ahhh-if only... if only...(Music..Dream Sequence..Cut to commercial...)-Ira.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
×
×
  • Create New...