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"Career Trajectory"


marvin

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Eric in another thread you stated:

"I only wish my career trajectory had given me the opportunity to do exactly what I wanted to do, all the time, like Don Henley and Bruce Springsteen."

This quotes intrigues me. What would you have done, if your "career trajectory" had given you the opportunity?

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Well, one of the things Clive said in "Marathon Man" was that "once you go pop, you can never go back." I assume he meant that you can never be considered a "serious rock artist" again. I wish he'd have mentioned that to me before I signed my contract, because, if he had, I wouldn't have signed with him. I was always envious of Billy Joel's career because he could release "Just The Way You Are" and follow it with "You May Be Right." That's called building a career. Columbia is famous for that. Arista is not. Sure, Barry Manilow has had great success, but can you name one Arista artist that had a career like Bruce or Billy?

ec

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Arista's biggest act other than Barry M has probably been Whitney Houston. Her recording career has been similar to Barry's , i.e. Adult Contemporary or MOR.

Eric it's never too late to do "exactly" what you want to do RIGHT NOW! Go for it, and we'll be right behind, supporting the move.

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Thanks, That's very sweet of you guys.

In truth, the business has changed, and the only way to make it today seems to be non-stop touring, or a starring role on a Disney sitcom.

Overall, things worked out just fine. I've been able to make a very good living doing something that I love. I've had a career most musicians can only dream about. I've written some really great songs, played with a lot of fine musicians and had a lot of fun doing it. Even got to play with a Beatle.

Don't cry for me, Argentina!

ec

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Not that I am a fan of Madonna but she reinvents herself with every album. I think artists who try something new are excepted by the people more than they might have been in earlier years. Things are changing faster and faster. You might lose a few people along the way but at the same time you gain a new audience.

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It's funny that you feel that way about yourself Eric.

You've always had that strong rock and roll voice. Pop/Rock, what's the difference? You've had more recognizeable songs than most rock bands.

Look at the Bee Gees...I read something somewhere what Robert Stigwood said about them..they were dead three times as a band and came back totally different each time and was successful.

This even after the Disco Sucks craze.

I don't think anyone ever considered the Raspberries dead, I think what happened was that they just left everyone wanting more after they went away.

Eric, you have absolutely nothing to prove, whether it's about being a pop artist or trying to be a rocker..the only thing you have to ask yourself is when you're on stage with the band how do you feel, and are you having fun?

And most of all how long do you want to do it for? I really believe that the reason all the groups from our time are giving it another crack at it is because there is absolutely garbage out there. There hasn't been any real music since the 80's.

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Playing devil's advocate here, doing what YOU WANT TO DO, (assuming it's a musical recording), won't get airplay, won't sell massive amounts, and endless touring is not an option. Still, a couple of pretty wise people (my mom and dad) once told me to never let anything stand in the way of what you want to do. I remember them saying, not to worry if it doesn't get mass acceptance. If it makes you happy, you've done your job. So you know what Mr Carmen, who said it was too to be Billy Joel and Bruce Springsteen?

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"Overall, things worked out just fine. I've been able to make a very good living doing something that I love. I've had a career most musicians can only dream about. I've written some really great songs, played with a lot of fine musicians and had a lot of fun doing it. Even got to play with a Beatle."

Your right Eric, but in all due respect you forgot something. Your music made a lot of people happy. You probably didn't want to say that, but that might be your greatest accomplishment professionally and personally. And that ain't so bad. No religious stuff here, but they say that God hears music above all else, so he must be one hell of a Raspberries fan.

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Joking aside, I'm with Marvin on this. Do what you've been doing for Raspberries! The same for your solo career if that's what you'd like to do. Do what you feel like doing when you feel like doing it. You've been very generous in telling us what the music business is like and how you've been treated. Now you're certainly in a position where you have the age, experience, and wisdom to do things for yourself (and still be with your family.) Fulfill YOUR dreams and be truly happy and the rest of us are happy, too.

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I agree that there's always a way if one wants to do something. Marvin's parents gave him great advice. So does Dr. Wayne Dyer who believes that whatever the environment (i.e. the metamorphosis of the music industry) we make our own limitations and expand our own horizons. There's always a way around an obstacle and people have become famous and rich just from "YouTube" believe it or not! There's always a way.

When you change the way you look at things, the things you look at change.

:) --Darlene

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Eric Carmen said:

Overall, things worked out just fine. I've been able to make a very good living doing something that I love.

And I know more than one musician who would have given anything to have half the career you've had. So as Martha Stewart would say: "It's a good thing." Don't ya love Martha and her insight?

As for me, my career goals were more on the level of...I don't know...say...being "Miss Erie." lol

Wendy (freezing and drenched in rainy San Fran)

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  • 4 years later...
Eric Carmen said:

Well, one of the things Clive said in "Marathon Man" was that "once you go pop, you can never go back." I assume he meant that you can never be considered a "serious rock artist" again. I wish he'd have mentioned that to me before I signed my contract, because, if he had, I wouldn't have signed with him. I was always envious of Billy Joel's career because he could release "Just The Way You Are" and follow it with "You May Be Right." That's called building a career. Columbia is famous for that. Arista is not. Sure, Barry Manilow has had great success, but can you name one Arista artist that had a career like Bruce or Billy?

This is a tragic revelation...Pop Kingmaker Clive doesn't support artists that like to go back and forth from pop to rock...And if he does "allow" it...King Clive has to hand pick the songs...All this control-freak ego stuff...It's enough to drive a weaker person like Whitney to drugs, I tell you!

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