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DiscLive or Instant Live?


JohnO

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As great as these live reunion shows have been, I can't help but wonder if the band's missing out on (maybe) a surefire way to get some quick cash. Bands such as the Pixies (on their latest reunion tour), the latest version of the Doors, Billy Idol, the Black Crowes and others have been using mobile recording studios to tape their live shows and sell recordings as soon as the shows are over, usually at $25 a pop or so for a double disk set. I suspect the major impediment to doing this would be the cost of the mobile studio, but I also think the Raspberries would have an instant demand by most concert attendees who've witnessed any of their excellent shows. Just a thought.......

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That's an idea, John O. When you do something like this, I've been told that the mix-down, of all the sounds, can take hours to do it right, because you want quality. Each song might have different sound levels, when they're played live. It takes time when you have alot of songs to go through. If one song has keyboards loud at the beginning, the next song is less, etc. A good thing to do is to watch what the sound engineer does, because you can set the same levels, later. Because the sounds are played differently live(maybe louder, because of a large room and people, you probably need to remix to stereo levels that you like when you intend to distribute them. Otherwise, everything is too loud, over a home or car stereo system. But, they can be mailed later. You can buy small trailers, like a 14 footer cheap, even when they are new. Buy a generator separate, about $300- $650.00. Look them up in the newspaper, or an RV magazine. A friend of mine, who sings, wants to do this. I told him he could go to shows, like music or comedy, and do this, and mail them, or sell them there. Comedy is the easiest to do, unless there's alot of music. You get your 'money's worth' when you make this a business to do for other people, too. Otherwise, it might not be a wise investment. I think it's better to rent something like this, when you need it for on-the-spot recordings.

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Oh, and remember to 'mic-up'the audience. This means you set mics towards the audience, or in the back to pick-up the live effect. And there are subtleties. At each part of a song, notes are accentuated, or played louder. It's a good idea to ask the musicians if your mix-down is close and correct to what they did live. Otherwise, the intent of what they want to convey (soft or loud instrumentals) is not on your new CD to sell. If you record the original live, this would be easier on the down-mix, because you can hear the different levels. Go through each song, and let the musicians listen, later. Remember, if a particular section was not loud or soft enough on the original, it can always be changed before distribution. I would write notes about the original recording, look at them, then do the mix-down.

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