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Detroit News: Hey, what's that supposed to mean?


LC

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Today's Detroit News has a feature comparing Detroit to Cleveland, and the writer takes a few gratuitous shots at the latter. She mentions Eric and 'Berries, but methinks she's taking a shot at our should-be Hall of Famers (that is, if I'm reading it right....).

Here's the link:

http://www.detnews.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060513/METRO/605130339/1003/rss

Here's the passage:

"Never mind that Detroit's rock, jazz and R&B scene is world class, from Eminem, Kid Rock and the White Stripes today, back to R&B legends Jackie Wilson and Little Willie John; jazz greats like Kenny Burrell and the Jones brothers; as well as Motown, Bob Seger, the MC5, Iggy Pop. Nah, we're not bitter.

"In return, Cleveland gave us polka king Frankie Yankovic, Eric Carmen and the Raspberries, Pere Ubu, Tracy Chapman, Trent Reznor of Nine Inch Nails, Macy Gray, Devo (actually, from Akron), Chrissie Hynde (actually, from Akron) and the Black Keys (uh, Akron again)."

She takes other swipes at different aspects of Cleveland, too....

Well, she can have Detroit. Cleveland rocks. (I don't live there, but grew up a few hours east and used to make annual trips to the city to see Yankees/Indians games with my dad.)

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Anybody can get into a p*ssing contest over which city gave us the best music (I've read numerous SF versus LA debates over the years). I personally think it's pretty damn humorous in this case, that anyone would seriously consider her first 3 examples (Eminem, Kid Rock, The White Hypes) to be in the same class with ANY of the Cleveland luminaries she named....unless we're solely considering record/CD sales volumes. But that's just my opinion.

I also suspect the Cleveland acts she names are the only ones she's aware of.

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You gotta be kidding me.... trying to make a case for Detroit by listing a vulgar, disgusting little puke like Eminem! Hey JohnO - I agree with your opinion. Whenever someone is trying to push an opinion or agenda you must ask yourself: "What facts is this person conveniently NOT telling us?". I wonder what other musicians from Cleveland she left out. In my opinion, just mentioning EC and the Berries is enough for Cleveland to beat out Detroit easily. But really.... this type of contest is rather childish and serves no real purpose.

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Its difficult to dent Detroit's musical heritage, theres alot of great artists, whether Motown or

some of the newer acts. Frankenberry, MC5 were from Lincoln Park, a downriver suburb of Detroit, they subsquently lived in Ann Arbor during the "John Sinclair" years. For this Detroit News writer to take a shot at Raspberries, and others, is absurd. With all the great stuff that emerged from Detroit, there was no band with the melodic pop rock sensibilities of Raspberries. And really I cant stand Eminem or Madonna, so while they are "big stars" from Detroit, some of it is rubbish in my opinion. I think the MC5 was a tremendous rock band that influenced alot of people. In a way, they are a parallel to Raspberries, but in a very hardrock sorta way. They never got their due, and made only three studio albums. The best thing Detroit ever produced, amongst all this talent, was the set of Motown studio musicians in my opinion. That band's talent and ability and vibe

still oooozes from those records. Marvin Gaye one of my all time favorites, though not actually from Detroit.

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It's just another stupid pissing contest between another Midwestern city and us, envious of our Rock Hall and trying to imply we don't really deserve to have it. I laugh in their general direction.

Come on, guys, you have Motown. That should be enough.

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That's the funny thing about this article....had she just mentioned Motown, or Motown and the MC5, Stooges, or maybe Mitch Ryder, it might have made me stop and think about her point.

But....tossing Eminem, the Shite Stripes (I'm sorry...White Stripes) and Kid Rock into the mix....Hell, I don't consider them positives for that city!

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While touring with the Berries early in the 70’s one of our favorite groups to play with was Brownsville Station. A Detroit-area rock & roll band formed in 1969 by guitarist Cub Koda. Original members also included Mike Lutz (guitar), T.J. Cronley (drums), and Tony Driggins (bass). Cub passed away in July of 2000 and I don’t know what happened to the rest of the group after it broke up in the late 70’s. These guys really rocked and put on a great show. We had a great relationship with these guys both band and crew.

I would never knock Detroit music as it has brought so many great artists and writers to music. However, Cleveland IS the rock and roll capitol of the world. To break out of Cleveland in the 70’s was very tough and the quality of musicians was and still is incredible. Just the list of players that came through bands with Raspberries personnel is mind boggling. It is inconceivable for anyone outside of the community to understand and have the opportunity like myself to see bands performing British rock, Motown, Horn bands, and every type of music you could think of during the 70’s and early 80’s. There was not a night that went by in Metro Cleveland where you could go and hear top quality music.

The only downside of Detroit music is that if my memory is correct (age you know), the top AM station in Detroit CKLW sort of blackballed GATW for a short while due to the lyrics. Boy, have times have changed

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Cub K. put out a bunch of cool solo albums in his post-Brownsville days (including his takes on/tributes to Chuck Berry and Bo Diddley ("Cub Does Chuck" and "Cub Does Bo"), wrote regular columns for Goldmine and several other record collector-type publications, and co-wrote "Blues for Dummies." I saw him live a couple of times, and it's clear that he had a repertoire of probably thousands of songs, and he loved playing. Cub had encyclopedic knowledge of rock & roll and roots music, and he, his writing, music, and great sense of humor are sorely missed.......

P.S. The best intros to Cub's music are the comp, "Welcome To My Job", and "Abba Dabba Dabba: A Bananza of Hits".

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Brownsville Station was a great band. I saw them for $1.50 at a local high school in Detroit. Boy have times changed. They could rock. It is always interesting to me to read about members of bands, who were actually from the midwest, though their careers may have taken off in NY or the West Coast. Its a long list.

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My own story about Brownsville Station: I saw them around 1976 (I think) after they just put out the self-titled album with "Martian Boogie" on it. They played for the Birthday Party for the local prog-rock station, and they were just plain excellent. However, it was the first time in a long time that they were on the main billing, and one of the drawbacks of playing support is that you often don't plan for encores. This St. Louis audience kept screaming and yelling for them to return again...and again...and again. They were finally reduced to doing Johnny Cash covers and a full throttle repeat of "Martian Boogie" on the third/fourth encores. A great night of music, though. Mr. Koda is definitely missed, as well as Henry "H-Bomb" Weck.

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