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Another Eric/ Rachmaninoff Connection


JumpMan

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This past Saturday night I was listening to WCLV, the local classical music station. The Cleveland Orchestra Youth Orchestra was performing Rachmaninoff's Symphony #2. I tuned in just as the 2nd movement was starting to hear, I assume, the tune eric was inspired by for "Never Gonna Fall In Love Again". What a pleasent surprise! I have been aware of this connection for other songa but was not aware of this particular inspiration/connection.

Now I really can't wait to hear eric at Severence Hall performing his music with a full orchestra and rock band. Also, It would be great to hear Raspberries perform again only this time as they did at the old Cleveland Agora. Songs with eric's piano intro's and more jaming. Eric, is there a possible date set for your Severence Hall? performance.

hypnohypno

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Rachmaniwho? Wasn't he the Beatles original drummer before Pete Best?

No, that was Rawkmanenough. He wore spandex, had a mullet and would set his drums and often, his date on fire during a show... Sadly he was about 20 years ahead of his time and no one understood him.
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What? Does someone have a great recipe for "Beef Rachmaninoff?!" A few years ago I arranged "Theme/Never Gonna Fall In Love Again" by Carmen/Rachmaninoff for my students to play on a school concert (with Eric's permission, of course), and it brought down the house. It was great to be able to say I knew the composer (Eric, not Rachmaninoff, although some of my kids might think I'm old enough to have known "Rach"!) and it was a great night of "music education" for my kids' parents.

People tend to know ABM but don't always connect it to the guy who composed NGFILA.

My string quartets will be studying that arrangement this coming semester.

smile --Darlene

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Speaking about school concerts, someone sent me this recording a few years ago of a Japanese High School band playing an original arrangement of "Go All The Way" (circa 1980). Check it out for more proof that Japan has one of the GREATEST appreciations for fine music in the world:

GO ALL THE WAY

Bernie

PSL The conductor of this beautifully arranged piece was Yoshiko Nakazawa.

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When I first heard that version on "ERICCARMENUNDERCOVER", I thought it had to be the most obscure cover ever of one of Eric's songs. Pretty ambitious for a high school band. Marv, I think that's a #1 (already been covered), and it was a 'yes'. Kirk.

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Bernie, that was surreal! You are a fountain of Raspberries surprises! Thanks, as always.

This orchestral "Go All the Way," of course, might be a little lacking in urgency, but it makes up for it in sheer beauty. I've listened to in a number of times, and I wish it were longer!

--Larry

PS: Hey, this was my 1,000th post! Hard to believe.... Still feels like I'm new here.

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Marv--Dug this out from awhile back:

ERIC SPEAKING

Quote:
Pierson, I wrote Go All The Way on the piano. I envisioned it with guitars and background vocals and all the rest but if it didn't stand up without all the stuff I wouldn't have even brought it in to the band. I could play it for you right now as a ballad at the piano and it works beautifully. It simply becomes more like Walk Away Renee or Don't Worry Baby.

--Kirk.

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Almost every piece of music I have ever truly loved, in any genre, from classical to rock, featured a melody that moved me. From "Warmth Of The Sun" to Rachmaninoff's Symphony No. 2, the one thing they had in common was a great and memorable melody. I love the Rollling Stones and Led Zep for different reasons, but the common denominator for the Beatles, Beach Boys, Bach and the rest is melody, pure and simple. That's precisely why hip-hop and rap do absolutely nothing for me. Those are rhythm based tracks, and even though I can kind of dig Outkast, there's nothing that what would ever propel me to want to hear those records a second ime. Melody is what separates McCartney and Wilson and the great classical composers from all the rest. It has to come from your soul. The ability to touch another human being with music is what elevates it to art. Snoop Dog is not art. ec

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Eric I agree with you 110%. It is the melody and "from the heart" that makes a song great. When I first hear some of today's music I think wow, that's pretty cool, I like it, then after hearing it 3-4 times I become bored with it because it just does not move me at all. I put you right up there with the long hairs with one GREAT exception........ you are alive!

Thanks for your music both past and future and also the sharing of your insight into the music industry with all of us. Eric you are too good and your music touches many people not to keep writing and singing.

What the world needs now is not more good bands but more bands playing good music. hypno

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Jump Man,

I agree with you and Eric as well! I listen to some of the stuff out today and I do the same thing - I like the song the 1st 5 times I hear it and after that it's not worth listening to it again.

I can listen to the Berries/Eric's music over and over again and enjoy it more each time.

More Please! pray

HT

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