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"NGFILA" Comeback.....at stores


Billy K.

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What has been interesting is that "Never Gonna Fall in Love Again" has been getting played a lot.

Not on the radio, but rather, on PA systems while shopping.

It seems that quite often, the song gets played at both Lowe's and Safeway, whenever I go in for hardware or groceries. This is Eric's version, not a sanitized instrumental.

And I go into these stores, at different times of day, and it happens to come on.

This is good.

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I've heard it in a lot of places, too. I always start singing it pretty loudly and get smiles from everyone. Somebody usually says, "Who's singing that?" and I'm always more than glad to oblige. If no one asks, I always start a conversation with someone I see about it, and make sure to start talking about Eric.

smile --D

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A lot of retailers subscribe to the same music provider. Ours used to be at the mercy of a dish on the roof, but now comes in on a p.c. Eric always gets NGFILA, Hungry Eyes, MMLC, and sometimes ABM in the rotation. Kirk.

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When Lobsterlvr Dave from Cranbury came to my NYE concert with the symphony, we played Rachmaninoff's Second Symphony in e minor, third movement (Never Gonna Fall In Love Again), to my complete happiness, and Dave's! It's so gorgeous. It seems to be making a comeback in classical circles too. I heard it recently performed on the radio. Raspberries/Eric music is "in the air" on EVERY wavelength!!!! Ahhh, this is almost as good as Dexter Green and Judy Jones getting a second chance...

smile --D

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Gene, I think it was one of the piano concertos. Rach's music is so beautiful. NGFILA is going to get a bit of a comeback in my schools, too. I plan to do an arrangement of it on my Spring concert. I did it last year (with permission), and it brought down the house! The audience loved it. I started out with the Rachmaninoff theme and changed to the uptempo version of NGFILA. I had arranged it in four voices for strings, and it sounded gorgeous. Not one to argue with success, I'll pull it out again. My string students like it as much as my arrangement of the shire theme from Lord of the Rings, which they also did last year. (The Winter concert featured my arrangement of Star Wars). I try to keep my kids interested with music they love as well as the classics.

Now, I'm searching for Harry Potter stuff.

smile --D

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I've been hearing "NGFILG" in dept. stores and hardware stores for years. I always whistle the high violin counter melody. I'm sure some of the non-musicians in the store are wondering what the hell song I'm hearing in my head...

I've always thought the melody of that song is stronger than "All By Myself"...Why else would John Travolta record it on his album instead? cool

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I always liked it more than "All By Myself" also. But I was disappointed when I recently bought and listened to the Rachmaninoff piece that "inspired" NGFILA (prompted by Darlene's posts). The melodies are so similar that I've concluded the song was more copied than written by Eric Carmen.

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Okay, time for a music lesson, folks.

I did a little online search and came up with these other examples of popular songs based on classical compositions. You can do your own search as I am certain they number in the thousands:

- "Piano & I", by Alicia Keys (based on Beethoven's Piano Sonata No. 14)

- "Basket Case" by Green Day (based on Pachelbel's Canon in D Major)

- "This Night" by Billy Joel (based on Beethoven's Pathetique Sonata)

- "Could It Be Magic" by Barry Manilow (based on Chopin's Prelude in C minor)

- "Lady Linda" by the Beach Boys (based on Bach's Jesu, Joy of Man's Desiring)

- "A Whiter Shade Of Pale" by Procul Harum (based on Bach's Orchestral Suite No. 3)

- "Because", by John Lennon (based on Beethoven's Piano sonata No. 14)

In other words, borrowing themes from classical music did not start with Eric's "Never Gonna Fall In Love Again," nor will it stop there as well. Perhaps the notoriety is more noteworthy because Eric assumed the piece he so admired was in the public domain (like most other classical pieces borrowed by other artists). Unbeknownst to him at the time, Rachmaninoff's estate still retained an ownership in his compositions. Therefore, that estate receives a SMALL portion of the royalties. The bits and pieces that Eric used in "Never Gonna Fall In Love Again" and "All By Myself" are SMALL, hence the cut the Rachmaninoff estate receives is SMALL as well.

Rachmaninoff himself was inspired by composers that came before him and one of his most well known and significant works was based on a theme from Paganini (although Paganini probably did not receive a cut :-)

Bernie

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Bernie, Thanks for clarifying. Actually, the themes aren't "copied" at all--Eric does so much to them melodically, rhythmically and harmonically, that they turn out being very different indeed.

There was a pop song out years ago called "Lovers' Concerto," and in fact, it wasn't based on a concerto at all. It was one of J.S. Bach's Minuets, copied note for note and changed into common (4/4) time. THAT was plagiarism! Borrowing a theme or themes to embellish, change, modify, elaborate on or build a piano fantasia (or any other kind of fantasia!) on is legitimate composition. Sometimes I hear Richard Strauss and can pick out some Wagner immediately, and there it is, note for note, incorporated into a larger work. Classical composers have been doing this from time immemorial!

smile --Darlene

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Sometimes when an Eric Carmen song is playing over the store music system I will bait one of my employees by asking "I wonder who does this song. It's one of my favorites". If they guess Eric, I delve a little deeper to find out just how much they know about him. If not, I clue them in. Either way, they end up finding out more about Eric than they probably want to smile Kirk.

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Bernie, great lesson, I've always wondered, if a piece of historical music is used in todays music artist writings, if a relative is a live, if they do get a partial cost, now I know.

But, if no one lived that was a relative or a related person was alive, Eric would recieve the whole shot.

When you register for a copyright, it's good until the day you pass on.

depending on the WILL OF INHERITANCE. Right?

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Actually, Gord, when you register for a copyright, it's good until years after you pass on. Not sure what the latest US rules are on this--whether it's 75 years after your death or what--but I believe that's what it was for Rachmaninoff, which is why his music was not in the public domain when Eric first began using parts of it (notice I did not say "plagiarized"--that would be like saying Rachmaninoff plagiarized Paganini). Rachmaninoff died in, I believe, 1943. 1975 makes only 32 years since his death and it was as a result of this, I understand, that his estate was able to eventually work its way legally into getting half the royalties off of "All By Myself" (and NGFILA if I'm not mistaken).

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