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pierson

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Everything posted by pierson

  1. right next to 'all by myslef' would have to be, "Got No Mind' by The Flashcubes--with that couplet: "then i lost it when i was 17/now my friends say i'm a has-been".... it's a different kinda sad
  2. Even better, David Paton and Ian Bairnson were part of Kate Bush's band on "Wuthering Heights" and other '70s recordings... Paton and Bairnson also formed a short lived band, KEATS, with Zombies vocalist Colin Blunstone in '84 (a very weak effort compared to their previous work). Pilot released 3 albums after the debut with "Magic" and all 3 saw improved songwriting (the last 2 only came out a imports)...the fianl album being their greatest ("Two's A Crowd")...which sadly was never issued on the CD like the other 3... in 2001 Paton and Bairnson went back to recut the majority of "Two's A Crowd" (which was originally produced by Alan Parsons) and retitled it "Blue Yonder"... At its best, this stuff is in the league of Eric's best solo work... it's hard to believe they could recut an album almost 25 years-old and not lose an ounce of its, no pun intended, magic...
  3. Otis Robb, i posted this reply to the "Cindy Bullens" post, but i think it's more fitting here...
  4. Well, the Pistols were "mainstream" in the UK from the go... going top 5 with singles etc... and being signed to major labels--all the while kicking like a mule... rotten tv did the same--get inside the system to corrupt it--or have fun... David Jo's Buster creation is pure showbiz... now he's doing more significant work... bands like Dwight Twilley & Artful Dodger could've sold more copies if they were exposed properly, although something about both bands was limiting in their ability to reach a wider audience--Twilley was not a strong front man-- Artful Dodger never had one song that could bust them open, although their albums were strong and several songs could've done well on radio...and they had big management and Columbia records behind them...
  5. BOSTON'S DEBUT ALBUM IS LIKE A MAGIC PILL ROCK RADIO RECORD--sadly it lacks substance and, more importantly, identity... Is it good? sure. Does it matter? no. I'm not sure that forsaking identity for melodic rock is a good payoff. Look what it lead to (foreignerstyxkansasjourneyreo mania). For rock and roll to remain on the radio all you need is a formula and do it well. For rock and roll to matter (i.e. be cutting and on edge like its forefathers), it needs something much more. That's why Boston gets more airplay than any other band in the tri-state area while kids trying to capture the spirit of rock and roll wish they could be as cutting (and cool) as Eddie Cochran, Johnny Cash, Gene Vincent, Little Richard, Sex Pistols, New York Dolls and Ramones--I heard 5 cuts off "Boston" in a 30 minute span on Thursday--I'm not expecting to hear any tunes from those aforementioned artists on commercial rock radio any time soon, bar the Ramones). And I've never heard one aspiring rocker say they want to be Brad Delp. Sure some aspire to the puppet master work of Scholz and I guess Boston were a definitive precursor to bands like Bon Jovi and Winger but that's nothing to be proud of. If Boston hadn't been pummeled into the DNA so ceaselessly, no one would ever noticed the difference between them and bands like New England, and Starz. And Artful Dodger and The Dwight Twilley Band were SOOO much better, especially if you were a diehard Raspberries fan.
  6. It's basically the Beatles blueprint... or how to follow it or use it to one's advantage... going solo is a much tougher task, however... Lots of artists remain significant enough, but aren't knocking down doors (i.e. Bowie, Brian Wilson, Pete Townsend, Bryan Ferry, McCartney, Prince) others wander strangely to good effect (Neil Young, Bob Dylan) or to less returns (Robert Plant, Todd Rundgren). These days, very few classic older artists are in that MOR stance they were in the '80s (i.e. solo Eagles, Eric Clapton, Rod Stewart, Elton John). Most of them are trying to create valid work, albeit to mixed results.
  7. YOU SEEM TO THINK THAT BEING A ONE-HIT WONDER DISCREDITS THE ARTIST OR IS AN UNWANTED STIGMA (maybe). ALL IT REALLY IS A FACT. (The book says: any artist who cracked the Billboard top 20 and never hit the top 40 again). They also list all the rest who entered the top 40 once but never again. In numerous cases (i.e. Hendrix, Joplin, Grateful Dead--who are, indeed one-hit wonders, as far as Billboard's singles charts go) it doesn't mean anything or make much sense. In other cases (i.e. Edison Lighthouse, White Plains, We Five, Syndicate Of Sound) it defines them.It is true, however, that once the practices of the chart numbers changed in the '90s, the concept of a single was different. Mainly, the concept works best from 1960-1990. There are, of course, others who had hits that didn't chart (i.e. Modern English's "Melt With You" and Romantics' "What I Like About You" [yes, they did chart afterwards], Dramarama's "Anything Anything")
  8. Eric Carmen is a different breed. Unlike Jackson, Dan, Don and Sting, his best material (Raspberries, mainly) hits with the cathartic rush of the boy/girl experience/sensation during the late teens early 20s... Something which none of those guys ever took a shot at--or if they did it was mere puff or a lame nostalgic pose. That stuff is in a different league (not for better or worse) than dudes trying to be intellectual. Yes, he's written adult stuff that explores deeper places (i.e. "Boats..") like Bernie pointed out, I believe. And the best stuff holds up well; his weaker stuff goes for cliches (i.e. "Almost Paradise"). The test of any lyricist is that his words resonate and defy cliches and other trite stuff. Eric's gift was that he created such drop-dead honest power pop lyrics that nailed the emotion to perfection without being cryptic, schamltzy or gloppy-- A VERY HARD THING TO DO...especially in the early '70s...
  9. Marvin, John Sebastian, T-Rex & Billy Swan are indeed, US one hit wonders--all 3 never made the top 40 after "Welcome Back, Kotter" "Bang A Gong" and "I Can Help" respectively... "Sunshine" was by Jonathan Edwards--no relation to Jonathan King who was, also, a one-hit wonder with "Everyone's Gone To The Moon" The Archies had 4 top 40 entries: "Sugar Sugar" (#1), "Bang Shang-a-lang" (#22), "Jingle Jangle" (#10) and "Who's Your Baby?" (#40)....
  10. Not true. (Although I'm not a fan of Reeves either). Here's what Bowie said: "Well it was a hard thing to inflict on people [Tin Machine] because it was such a selfish propostition. It really was. And I knew nobody would accept me in a band. But it wasn't the point. My point was to be able to radically strip down everything I was about. And I had to it for myself. I wouldn't be doing what I do now if I hadn't taken that step. All credit to Reeves to convince me to go with my instinct. I said, 'You know Reeves, for me, creatively, the best thing I could do at this moment is cut it all off and restart everything from the ground up.'As harsh and sometimes weak as Tin Machine was, it was at least showing Bowie was heading in the right direction; away from "Never Let Me Down" and "Tonight" era glop...and trying to create from gut... As much as I don't care for Reeves style, he did a lot of work on "Hours"--one of Bowie's finest albums...
  11. Marvin,I think that "Band On The Run" (9 songs: 'Band On The Run," "Jet," "Bluebird," "Mrs Vanderbilt," "let Me Roll It," "Mamunia," "No Words," "Picasso's Last Words [Drink To Me]" and "Nineteen Hundred & Eighty Five") is grossly overrated amongst the McCartney canon. Especially compared to the underrated "Ram" (12 songs: "Too Many People," "3 Legs," "Ram On," "Dear Boy," "Uncle Albert/Admiral Halsey," "Smile Away," "Heart Of The Country," "Monkberry Moon Delight," "Eat At Home," "Long Haired Lady," "Ram On [reprise]" and "The Back Seat Of My Car"). I think the idea has been spread by fans and people who just immediately think it's the "best" McCartney post-Beatles album. I think it's good, but it doesn't cut as deep as "Ram" (i.e. "Too Many People" and "Dear Boy"). It's hard to imagine Eric Carmen coming back to an edgier M.O. I DO, however, think he's capable of making a strong 'pop' album that's reminiscent to Brian Wilson and McCartney's best current stuff.
  12. MARVIN, TRY A GOOGLE OR YAHOO SEARCH FOR: VAN DUREN "ARE YOU SERIOUS" AND SEE WHAT COMES UP... THAT'S HIS FIRST SOLO LP WHICH CAME OUT IN '77 AND DISAPPEARED UNTIL RECENTLY WHEN THE JAPANESE LABEL AIRMAIL RECORDING REISSUED IT ON CD... I THINK THE STUDIO TROD NOSSEL ALSO HAS A LABEL AND IS REISSUING HIS STUFF DOMESTICALLY... HE HAD HIS LONG "LOST" 2ND LP ISSUED ON CD, IT'S CALLED 'IDIOT OPTIMISM'--BOTH DISCS ARE HIGHLY RECOMMENDED.... MUCH LIKE ERIC CARMEN, HIS '80S WORK WAS SLICK AND MORE ADULT CONTEMPORARY... HE FORMED A BAND CALLED GOOD QUESTION... PLEASE SEEK OUT THE "ARE YOU SERIOUS" STUFF FIRST AND GO FROM THERE... IT IS HIGHLY RECOMMENDED TO FANS OF TODD RUNDGREN, EMITT RHODES, AND ERIC & THE RASPBERRIES
  13. A FEW LIFE-CHANGING OPENERS...HAMELL ON TRIAL W/ WILCO @ MERCURY LOUNGE, NYC--WILCO HAD JUST RELEASED MY FAVE LP OF 1996, "BEING THERE"...IT DIDN'T MATTER, ED (HAMELL ON TRIAL) BLEW MY MIND WITH ONE OF THE MOST INTENSE PERFORMANCES EVER... DEFINITELY THE GREATEST ONE-MAN ROCK AND ROLL SHOW I'D EVER SEEN... SINCE THEN I'VE SEEN HIM DOZENS OF TIMES....ALWAYS AMAZING.... REPLACEMENTS W/ ELVIS COSTELLO--MARYLAND CIRCA 1990.. LAST REPLACEMENTS TOUR (AND VERY CLOSE TO THEIR LAST GIG) THEY DID AN INSANE 45-MINUTE BEST-OF SET THAT DEFIED THEIR LEGACY AS DRUNKEN MISFITS WHO WERE USUALLY A SLOPPY MESS... ELVIS'S "MIGHTY LIKE A ROSE" TOUR SET, IS HARDLY A MEMORY... POLICE@ CARRIER DOME/SCREEN TEST @ THE JAB--SYRACUSE 1982: SAME NIGHT, SAW THE COPS IN THE DOME FOR THE SYNCHRONICITY TOUR.... ABSOLUTELY FORGETTABLE MESS... SCREEN TEST WERE PLAYING DOWN THE STREET AT SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY CLUB CALLED THE JAB, OUR POLICE TICKET STUBS GOT US IN FOR 1/2 PRICE--MY 1ST "CLUB" EXPERIENCE... SCREEN TEST WERE 3/4'S OF THE FLASHCUBES AND WERE AT THEIR PEAK IN '82. AN AMAZING NIGHT THAT CLEARLY ESTABLISHED THE POWER OF A CLUB PERFORMANCE VS. AN ARENA SHOW.... TOMMY ALLEN ON DRUMS
  14. What Is Happy, Baby- The Cowsills Just One Victory- Todd Rundgren
  15. WELL, MOST DEFINITLEY ON "I DON'T KNOW WHAT I WANT" AND IN PARTS OF "PLAY ON" AND "I CAN HARDLY BELIEVE YOU'RE MINE".... ALSO, FOR MORE MOON-ESQUE DRUMMING CHECK OUT "ECSTASY" FROM "SIDE 3" WHICH FEATURES JIM BONFANTI...THIS STYLE OF PLAYING IS KEY TO THE BAND'S MO WHICH WAS TO BLEND THE POWER OF THE WHO WITH THE MELODIC SENSE OF THE BEACH BOYS... WITHOUT THE 'OUT OF CONTROL' MOON-ESQUE DRUMMING, IT WOULDN'T BE AS INTENSE OF A SONIC EXPERIENCE...ERGO THE MAGIC OF THE 'BERRIES
  16. The first lesson: No one's taste is "better" or "worse" than the next person's... it's all subjective and personal... One's ability to stand by their taste's is another thing... that's why i enjoy going back and forth w/ marvin about things... i enjoy that people express clearly how and why they perceive things and why music resonates and strikes a chord with them... the only thing i wish is that people open themselves up to the vast "unheard" stuff that could easily take hold of their hearts like the 'Berries and Eric... that's how Tommy and Bob Allen (and other close friends) turned me onto April Wine, Artful Dodger, Big Star, Van Duren, Emitt Rhodes, Pagliaro, Badfinger, A Foot In Cold Water....
  17. Marvin, It should be noted that being "cuttin edge" is not neccessarily a good thing and that the majority of rock and pop musicians who have left "cutting edge" bands to forge a career as a solo artist usually lose a certain amount of artistic aplomb. The quickest comparison to Eric would most likely be Paul McCartney who, despite making strong credible solo albums, was never again deemed "cutting edge." Eric followed a similar path, but as you said, followed the track of his biggest hits, which were ballads, and that's where his strengths lied. It's a tough call to make as to whether Eric's solo work showed any artistic growth. The first two solo albums truly show the work of a major artist and resonate with specific vision. Once the hits dried up, the work loses some weight (see "Change Of Heart"). "Tonight You're Mine," despite it's bad cover art was his strongest collection of songs and was something which connected with the spirit of the artist who we knew in The Raspberries. Sadly, nothing off of it became a hit. From there on in, Eric never regained any substantial artistic footing. Instead, he took on the role of adult contemporary/pop songwriter, and would land the fleeting soundtrack work which showed him doing stuff "by the numbers" (see: "Almost Paradise"). The '80s was a decade of survivalist instincts for any major artist from the early '70s (i.e. Rod Stewart, David Bowie, Paul McCartney, Stevie Wonder, Elton John). Take one look at their '80s output and compare it to their work which defined them in the early '70s and it's almost a sin against mankind. All of them shed their "artistic cred" to cut pap for the masses with bloated '80s production and banal topics and themes. Luckily, for Eric, most of his '80s hits were done by other artists. In a perfect world, Eric Carmen would fall into the circle of Elvis Costello and make a brilliant adult pop/rock album like Costello & Bacharach's "Painted From Memory" or McCartney's "Flowers In The Dirt." That's basically how it's been done. In Bowie's case, he found Reeves Gabrel, in Elton's case, he found Ryan Adams. In Rod and Stevie's case, they have yet to wake up. Also, Todd Rundgren, where are you?
  18. Jan & Dean's first top 10 hit was in 1958 ("Jennie Lee") and was followed by another top 10 hit ("Baby Talk") in 1959--four years ahead of the Beach Boys... there were a few other vocal groups who influenced Brian Wilson as well as the Ronettes/Phil Spector, BUT, Jan & Dean were monumental in the shaping of the Beach Boys.. I will post here, a recent excerpt written by Bob Lefsetz, regarding the passing of Jan Berry--Bob has given his permission to post this: "In the sixties, California was a dream. Most people credit Brian Wilson. But Jan Berry was there first. At the present time, the only surf music that seems to survive is instrumental. The renaissance of songs about the beach and girls is still in the offing. But those of us who lived through that era were indelibly stamped. The only thing akin to that era was the nineties economic run-up. When money was plentiful and people were consuming. But the early sixties were different. The early sixties were about both hedonism and hope. Hope on both an individual and societal level. Hope that there could be societal equality. Both racially and economically. Hope that the future could be better than the past. Hope that we would be both happy and fulfilled. That hope was in Jan Berry's music. It could be as simple as the possibilities re the new girl in school. "I got it bad for the new girl in school The guys are flipping but I'm playing it cool Everybody's passing notes in class They really dig her now she's such a gas" You might find these words laughable. I consider them poetry. The most meaningful words are the most basic. Ones spoken from the heart. Today's novelists lay on so much description that their books are unreadable. Today's songwriters write in such universal platitudes that their works slide right off of you. But THIS you could envision. If you didn't check out the new girl or boy in school, you're not human. You've been with the same people for YEARS! Now there's new blood. This is what passes for EXCITEMENT in high school, hell JUNIOR HIGH! Now make no mistake, just because they're not in the news today, Jan and Dean were HOUSEHOLD NAMES! They HOSTED the T.A.M.I. Show. A cavalcade of stars ranging from the Rolling Stones to Chuck Berry to Lesley Gore. Hell, as they sang, THEY'RE COMING FROM ALL OVER THE WORLD! And they were into skateboarding LONG before Tony Hawk. "Grab your board and go sidewalk surfin' with me" Now this was sung to the tune of the Beach Boys' "Catch A Wave", still, the lyrics were so contemporary. It was a CRAZE! There was hit after hit, like the immortal "Little Old Lady From Pasadena". And then there was the prescient "Dead Man's Curve". Jan Berry did not have his car accident on this famous strip of Sunset Boulevard near U.C.L.A. No, he crashed into a gardener's truck in Beverly Hills. And he didn't die. He was just incredibly fucked up. He suffered brain damage.
  19. ERIC, WITH THE RASPBERRIES WERE CUTTING EDGE INSOFAR AS THEY MERGED '60S POP LIKE THE BEACH BOYS AND LEFT BANKE WITH THE POWER OF THE WHO AND THE KINKS...THUSLY CREATING THE BLUE PRINT FOR POWER POP IN 1972... OTHERS WERE MINING SIMILAR TERRAIN (Badfinger, Big Star) BUT THE 'BERRIES WERE THE MOST INCENDIARY (See: "Tonight," "Play On," "I Don't Know What I Want" and "Ecstasy"). ERIC, AS A SOLO ARTIST WAS DEFINITELY NOT CUTTING EDGE.
  20. "SIBHASHIAN" (Sib Hashain their drummer) is the title of song by Veruca Salt, me thinks
  21. ALSO,Bill Lloyd's solo debut, "Feeling The Elephant" which may or may not be hard to find--a perfect mix of Marshall Crenshaw pop strength and Tommy Keene's rock strain...
  22. have you heard "hours" or "Heathen"??? both albums are his best work since "Scary Monsters"... I prefer "hours".... a real major album which no one gives enough props to
  23. well, i hope the Raspberries rebelled in a Mod sense, to such stuff, although, near the end they wore bell-bottoms and grew their hairout-- I lean towards the mod sensibility the band adhered to in the beginning, however that applies in the 21st century, i don't know
  24. Mine is almost in reverse, mainly because 1984 production quality is abysmal (linn drums, ugh) and that "stale" sound was actually very alive...obviously we have completely two different tastes in music... yours seems to prefer the slick, more MOR side of things... I like Eric at his most cutting and vital where he was set on creating something of his deepest rawest emotions (i.e. "Let's Pretend," "Go All The Way," "If You Change Your Mind," "I Can Hardly Believe You're Mine," "Tonight") and the band was still playing as if they were trying to get laid... 1. Starting Over 2. Fresh 3. Side 3 4. Raspberries 5. Eric Carmen 6. Tonite You're Mine 7. Boats Against The Current 8-10. tie Winter Dreams/Eric Carmen 1984/Change Of Heart
  25. MARVIN, I don't blame Boston. Still, they don't deserve the airplay. All one has to do is look at their record collections to see the disservice. I know that mega-selling albums of the '70s make up the core for classic rock radio, but stations and programmers have made adjustments. Bruce Springsteen and The Grateful Dead are two examples. Stations also have shifted the focus of Led Zep's IV album (which was almost pummeled to the point of uselessness between 1977 and say, 1990) to countless other key tracks from all of their albums. Boston, unlike Twilley or Raspberries showed no artistic growth (hence the "marked" difference) and unlike Artful Dodger, they weren't that spectacular of a live band (to back the BIG rock record). And of course they had that dreaded facial hair not to mention the faceless image which paved the way for countless boring corporate rock bands. Their debut album is strong and sounds great on the radio, but what it lacks is an ineffable magic and pure rock and roll heart which bands like Aerosmith and Cheap Trick had. They may rock hard, but there's a safe predictable air to it. They were devoid of danger, a sense of humor and a sense of artistic purpose which, almost all classic rock artist who are played as much have. That's why it feels like it's undeserving.
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