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hosskratz

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About hosskratz

  • Birthday 12/10/1955

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  1. Bringing the induction back to Cleveland is justice, as this is where the hall is located. Having Raspberries play the VIP show is pure class and vindication to a great rock and roll city. The night's yours, enjoy, rock out and keep in mind that all of your fans are with you in spirit. Let them see what we already know, Cleveland and Cleavelanders ROCK!!!
  2. 2. michael brown (Left Banke) 3. Steve Marriot 4. Robin Zander (Cheap Trick) 5. Dwight Yoakim (what can I say, I love country)
  3. A friend of mine named Tyler opened a music store in McHenry after years of playing in various local bands. About a year after opening the store he was diagnosed with brain cancer. He had met Rick Neilsen several time in his music career and Rick called him several times to see how he and his family were doing. A real class act. When you stop by D.C.Cobbs, check out the Woodstock theatre up the street. My daughter is one of the managers there.
  4. Crg 2, I was joking. Eric, I remember reading that during the fifties and early sixties, artists such as Buddy Holly and others who wrote their owns songs would be recording and someone in the studio would add a word or have them change someting and then be listed in the writing credits as well as the copyright. I also remember that artists such as Outsiders, The Buckinghams and others who recorded would usually have to do covers of other artists songs as part of their deal to get their recording contract. They were limited to how many songs that they could record that they wrote. Sort of like "That Thing You Do". So the bands didn't really get all that much did they?
  5. I the world had a nuclear war, the only things left on this earth would be cockroaches and lawyers. And the lawyers would probably try to sue the cockroaches.
  6. Eric, while I have always enjoyed your solo work, I have always felt that you were too restrained and safe at times. Hearing all the bs you had to put up with labels and producers confirms that. Winter Dreams may have been on a shoe string budget, but it sounds like you at least got a chance to make it more in your vision. Are there any songs you would like to re-record now? After hearing the live cd, your voice hasn't lost anything.
  7. All By Myself and Sunrise got me hooked on Eric's solo music, but the entire Boats Against The Current just blew me away, a true classic album. I understand what you are saying Eric about Clive Davis, what he did to the single version of Boats as opposed to the album cut is blasphemy.
  8. Ditto Hollies, and in response to Sterling, I have lived in Illinois for the past 30 years and have heard about the glory days of the battles between WLS and Super CFL. When you listen to the music of the mid sixties, you can see the foundation of which power pop and rock music drew their inspiration from. Eric had a vision and shared same with Wally, Dave and Jim and the collaboration turned into the music we loved. This is the true "heart" of rock and roll.
  9. When I was a kid, I remember listening to WABC in New York, and living in New Jersey, I remember that you could hear the Beatles, followed by the Four Tops, followed by the Lovin Spoonful to be followed by any number of different artists at any given time. You could hear the Mersey beat, r and b, doo wop, anything, it was what was hot and current, but more importantly, you liked what you heard and what you liked was what was played. In retrospect, it was "magic", a chance to listen and dream and escape and emulate the big stars. Eric, to me this was the "magic" that fueled Raspberries, and why, in Cleveland, Ohio, the harder edge that was the norm could be united with the pop simplicity that made the British Invasion so refreshing. I have read when you mention artists that you were influenced by and admired and always was impressed by how you would mention artists such as the Searchers and Lesley Gore. Given todays music, and how to me, a lot of it is formulamatic, I again have to say thank you for the reunion tour and for the fact that you, Wally, Dave, Jim, Scott and Mike could make that great music as Raspberries, and that you could stay true to yourself when you went solo. Thirty plus years since first hitting the scene, the music has stood the test of time and still is a testament of what rock and roll is all about. I always wish that radio could go back to those magical days of the mid sixties but I guess that would be asking too much. These days, radio stations are too narrow in their context, not enough styles are played on the same station. What do you think of Radio today Eric?
  10. They're Coming to Take Me Away HaHa = Napoleon xiv Born Too Late - The Poni Tails The Little Space Girl - Jesse Lee Turner Don't Think Twice (It's alright) - Wonder Who (actually the Four Seasons)
  11. How about the original "The Letter" by the Box Tops. Flows from beginning to end.
  12. The show did rock, it was in Mundelein. While we are talking about it, another reason Wally puts out the magic, Eric, Dave and Jim, they make a tight unit for Wally to work with. That's the magic of music, complement each others strong points rather than upstage or overpower. Check out the youtube video of Wally and Jesse Bryson performing Princes, Wally's work really brings back memories of Raspberries.
  13. In reference to James' jamming comment, I got the opportunity to see Wally jam onstage with the Drysdales during a cd party they held. They has invited Scott McCarl to join them, and he in turn got Wally to join him for the show. Wally, Scott and the Drysdales did a 12 minute jam of the old Traffic song "Feeling Alright" in which Wally got to really let loose. I remember this especially because someone in the crowd bellowed out loudly "where the F@#@#@ has this guy been hiding, he's F@@@@##$ awesome. Indeed he was that night. The magic about Wally is, he plays what the song or group calls for, not for just being a "guitarslinger". In Raspberries, he is the ultimate complete guitarist, such as those mentioned in other posts, much like Elliot Easton of the Cars. In my opinion, he takes the George Harrison style to a new high with his lead work as well as the harmonics and other magic he throws into the songs. Like Eric has said, after auditioning "a jillion players" it came down to Jim and him that Wally was THE player for Raspberries. Wally can shred with the best of them, but he is better than that, the music comes first.
  14. Eric, how was it working with Danny Korchmar, Russ Kunkel and Leland Sklar, aka "the Section" on the Change of Heart Album? If I am not mistaking, they were working with both Jackson Browne and James Taylor, especially as part of their touring band during the time around Change came out. I especially remember Danny's guitar solo on "End of the World". They seemed to be a tight unit.
  15. On Harmony Central today, Eastwood guitars is announcing that they are remaking the old Ovation Breadwinner electric guitar. Wally is mentioned as an artist who used this model. I remember Wally saying he owns one in an interview. The original Breadwinners are rare so Wally is in exclusive company. Any plans on showing us a picture of Wally's breadwinner Bernie?
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