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Lew Bundles

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  1. If you’ve never read any of Levinson’s books, they are kind of cool in the way he weaves fiction in and out of historical events... If I remember correctly, the opening chapter had Harry Nilsson, alone In his thoughts, as he rides in the back of a cab in NYC, on his way to the Dakota, to visit Yoko, shortly after Lennon’s murder... THE JOHN LENNON AFFAIR Robert S. Levinson, Author . Forge $24.95 (352p) ISBN 978-0-312-87902-0 Levinson's long experience in music public relations, the handling of rock stars, and writing and producing has provided him with material and styles enough for three novels, but not enough of substance for any one novel. Following hot on the heels of The James Dean Affair and The Elvis and Marilyn Affair, his latest eulogizes the murdered Beatle, the story split between Lennon's own time and a huge, mob-inspired John Lennon Imagine That! Memorial Rock Festival in 2001. Making their third appearance are Levinson's series protagonists, newspaperman Neil Gulliver and TV actress Stevie Marriner, known as the "Sex Queen of the Soaps." Gulliver covered Lennon's death, and now he and Stevie find themselves appearing in the massive festival in his honor. Someone doesn't want them around, though, and will kill to keep them away. Ironically, among the parade of stock supporting characters—crooks, assassins, drunken Indians, politicians, actors, sinister Treasury agents and "Feebies" (FBI agents)—Lennon himself is only peripheral. He is given occasional lines, once at an earlier festival: "They have a bloody foogin' concert in me honor to raise money to wipe out weapons, and it brings on one gun going off after the bleeding next." It may be news that Mark David Chapman, who shot him, had been hired to shoot President-elect "Dutch" Reagan instead. Enough names are dropped to fill an agent's Rolodex (including those in a lengthy author's note), and gags abound, but more attention to plot would have been helpful for the bewildered reader. Readers who pick this up hoping for all Beatles all the time will be disappointed—what they'll get is a mediocre mystery with the musician as hook and the rock scene as background décor. (Aug.) https://www.publishersweekly.com/9780312879020
  2. Bernie...is that indeed true?...I thought Eric said once that he didn’t actually remember that...
  3. Yea...Strange choice...I would have chosen Tonight or I Don’t Know What I Want...
  4. https://www.spin.com/2021/06/best-record-stores-in-united-states/
  5. Anna R is the only other person I recognize...Boffo video...
  6. If you’ve never heard this...from the lp Pussy Cats...
  7.    Eric Carmen's "All By MySelf" and Rachmaninoff's Piano Concerto No 2 559 views Subscribe  John Doe unread,11/1/11 to I vaguely recalled that was Barry Manilow singing "All by myself", but obviously it was some guy named Eric Carmen. Some of the music was copied from Rachmaninoff's Piano Concerto No 2 Mvt II? Thanks. Steven Bornfeld unread,11/2/11 to  Yes. Unfortunately for Eric, he didn't have Manilow's staying power. Unfortunately for us, Barry did. 😉 Steve -- Mark & Steven Bornfeld DDS http://www.dentaltwins.com Brooklyn, NY 718-258-5001 anon unread,11/3/11 to Steven Bornfeld <bornfe...@dentaltwins.com> wrote: > On 11/1/2011 3:09 PM, John Doe wrote: >> I vaguely recalled that was Barry Manilow singing "All by myself", >> but obviously it was some guy named Eric Carmen. >> >> Some of the music was copied from Rachmaninoff's Piano Concerto No >> 2 Mvt II? >> >> Thanks. > > > Yes. Unfortunately for Eric, he didn't have Manilow's staying power. > Unfortunately for us, Barry did. 😉 > > Steve Even by schlock standards, I must say Manilow was as soul-less and uninspired as they come. Every song seemingly arranged the same way, sung the same way. Even when doing a cover, he truly knew how to strip a good song of its artistic qualities. Compare, for example, his version of "It Never Rains In Southern California" with the original: Manilow: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gbkoohvd3cw Original: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zESYDjWrpbA At least Eric Carmen appreciated classical music, and could even rock out once in a while. But yes, Carmen wrote and performed the original, even though IMO he left out the 2nd movement's best part, i.e. the flute intro. Steven Bornfeld unread,11/3/11 to  I will admit to having purchased The Raspberries first album when it came out. I was wrong to imply he was anything like a one-hit wonder, as he's apparently (based on his Wikipedia entry) been working more or less steadily except for a few years in the early 1980s. As far as Carmen and Rachmaninoff, the entry states: His first two solo singles were chart hits in 1976. Both were built around themes by Sergei Rachmaninoff. The first of these singles, "All By Myself" – an adaptation of a theme from Rachmaninoff's Piano Concerto No. 2 – hit #2 in the United States, and #12 in the United Kingdom where it was his only charting hit. It sold over one million copies, and was awarded a gold disc by the R.I.A.A. in April 1976.[3] The follow-up single, "Never Gonna Fall in Love Again" – heavily inspired by the main theme of the slow movement of Rachmaninoff's Symphony No. 2 – reached #11 on the Billboard Hot 100, and hit #1 on the US Adult Contemporary Chart, as well as #1 on the Cash Box chart. In any case, a talented guy. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eric_Carmen  John Doe unread,11/3/11 to anon <anon anon.invalid> wrote: > Steven Bornfeld <bornfeldmung dentaltwins.com> wrote: >> John Doe wrote: >>> Some of the music was copied from Rachmaninoff's Piano >>> Concerto No 2 Mvt II? >> Yes. Thanks for the confirmation. > Even by schlock standards, I must say Manilow was as soul-less > and uninspired as they come. Every song seemingly arranged the > same way, sung the same way. Even when doing a cover, he truly > knew how to strip a good song of its artistic qualities. Right. Now get over it. > But yes, Carmen wrote and performed the original, even though > IMO he left out the 2nd movement's best part, i.e. the flute > intro. Sounds like you're trying to attribute Rachmaninoff's work to him. I don't know why anyone seriously interested in music would be so adoring of a musician who copies someone else's musical work, especially when it's practically has only decent song. Yeah, it's a good song, but the music isn't even original. -- > Path: news.astraweb.com!border6.newsrouter.astraweb.com!not-for-mail > Message-ID: <4eb2547b$0$26093$c3e8da3$c14f6927 news.astraweb.com> > From: anon <anon anon.invalid> > Subject: Re: Eric Carmen's "All By MySelf" and Rachmaninoff's Piano Concerto No 2 > Newsgroups: rec.music.classical > References: <4eb043df$0$1050$c3e8da3$9f400e27 news.astraweb.com> <j8sgub$qcg$1 dont-email.me> > User-Agent: tin/2.0.0-20110623 ("Burnside") (UNIX) (Linux/3.0.0-12-generic (i686)) > Date: 03 Nov 2011 08:44:43 GMT > Lines: 32 > Organization: Unlimited download news at news.astraweb.com > NNTP-Posting-Host: be0a2294.news.astraweb.com > X-Trace: DXC=HgJPgR3kX3a]`e1HJ8=:?`L?0kYOcDh jUSZ2M?]P07e]OJTWN^F8Nf8WZUc:ZBMXoB Vm4B7aT1kiR7:H8<I<1hbN?c 1>k2JoL8a:?DJm2=` > anon unread,11/4/11 to John Doe <jd...@usenetlove.invalid> wrote: >> Even by schlock standards, I must say Manilow was as soul-less >> and uninspired as they come. Every song seemingly arranged the >> same way, sung the same way. Even when doing a cover, he truly >> knew how to strip a good song of its artistic qualities. > > Right. Now get over it. I write the posts (wait for it...) that make a young girl cry. > Sounds like you're trying to attribute Rachmaninoff's work to him. > > I don't know why anyone seriously interested in music would be so > adoring of a musician who copies someone else's musical work, > especially when it's practically has only decent song. Yeah, it's > a good song, but the music isn't even original. Actually, only the verse section was based on Rachmaninoff, and even then, the melody obviously underwent some tweaking. Carmen deserves some credit for transforming a quiet romantic piano piece into a rather grandiose yet compelling power ballad. anon unread,11/4/11 to Steven Bornfeld <bornfe...@dentaltwins.com> wrote: > I will admit to having purchased The Raspberries first album when it > came out. > I was wrong to imply he was anything like a one-hit wonder, as he's > apparently (based on his Wikipedia entry) been working more or less > steadily except for a few years in the early 1980s. > As far as Carmen and Rachmaninoff, the entry states: > > His first two solo singles were chart hits in 1976. Both were built > around themes by Sergei Rachmaninoff. The first of these singles, "All > By Myself" ??? an adaptation of a theme from Rachmaninoff's Piano Concerto > No. 2 ??? hit #2 in the United States, and #12 in the United Kingdom where > it was his only charting hit. It sold over one million copies, and was > awarded a gold disc by the R.I.A.A. in April 1976.[3] The follow-up > single, "Never Gonna Fall in Love Again" ??? heavily inspired by the main > theme of the slow movement of Rachmaninoff's Symphony No. 2 ??? reached > #11 on the Billboard Hot 100, and hit #1 on the US Adult Contemporary > Chart, as well as #1 on the Cash Box chart. > > In any case, a talented guy. > > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eric_Carmen > > Steve He definitely didn't earn comparisons to McCartney and Brian Wilson for no reason, some of the chord progressions from the early albums were almost too good to be true, quite sophisticated with modulations all over the place. Steven Bornfeld unread,11/5/11 to  I actually hadn't heard the comparisons (nor do I remember many of his early songs). I do like modulations in pop songs when they make sense. They at least imply the writer has some facility with his/her scales ;-). It can be overdone. I'm definitely in the minority--many call Kern's "All the Things You Are" the best popular song ever written. I think the modulations here are almost a fetish. But modulations can add interest to the melodic line (to say nothing of the harmonizations).
  8. How about this one?... https://www.skysports.com/racing/form-profiles/horse/1116495/eric-carmen-ire
  9. https://www.pinalcentral.com/pcso-eric-carmen/image_0b00664b-3ada-5bef-9208-1cefee455794.html
  10. Read paragraph six... https://howto.org/who-is-married-to-eric-carmen-62077/
  11. Horace Wimp's ELO Fan Forum 8 songs from Eric Carmen Platypus Eric Carmen first came to note as lead singer/songwriter of the power pop group Raspberries, but is best known as an artist under his own name after the breakup of the group. He is versatile, having learned classical piano and teaching himself guitar. He did keyboards, guitar, bass and vocals in Ringo Starr's 6th All Starr Band in the year 2000. His material has also been successful for others - That's Rock'n'Roll was a #3 hit for Shaun Cassidy, and films Dirty Dancing and Footloose featured his writing/co-writing, the first with Hungry Eyes, the second having Almost Paradise declared as its Love Theme. I remember him mostly via All By Myself, enjoying the Rachmaninoff borrowing, and even though it's not all he does, he certainly produced plenty of those plaintive, overwrought ballads. Here's a few: 01. All By Myself 02. Hungry Eyes 03. Make Me Lose Control 04. Almost Paradise 05. That's Rock 'n' Roll 06. She Remembered 07. Never Gonna Fall In Love 08. Sunrise: - - - - jrmugz Aug 30, 2016 at 5:58am Looking forward to it Platy; lots of memories of the self-titled album, with a few of those songs, being played by older siblings in my house. I had the 45 of "She Did It" as well, back in the day. Jim - - - - jrmugz Sep 2, 2016 at 10:44pm Didn't forget the review, plat, just been slammed at work, etc. I have been playing the and enjoying the tunes, ideally a review tomorrow, have it on my to do list. Jim - - - - jrmugz Sep 3, 2016 at 10:45am OK Plat, here is my take on the songs. 01. "All By Myself" - Love the very sincere lyric, the Harrisonesque guitar solo, and the classical break, thanks for pointing out that aspect of Eric Carmen, I could really see it when I heard that break. Always very refreshing to here such a sincere and genuine song. 02. "Hungry Eyes" - So the pop instincts and abilities are incredible, as with all of these. The lyric, I wish would go a little beyond and examine what the hunger in the eyes is really all about, something deeper that shouldn't come off as only skin deep. 03. "Make Me Lose Control" - Great chorus, again suffers from a lyric that suffers from the anti-climactical "OK, well then what's the point of life, just having an orgasm with someone?" But other than that it was clever the references of Jenny and he old favorite songs, it was a clever lyric as far as that goes. But again, like the previous song, the lyric is firing a gun and missing the target. It's like "let's just get lost in doing it, since there is nothing else to do." 04. "Almost Paradise" - Great vocals to a great song. But like Phil Collins, worships the relationship over why do men and women get married anyways, and who created this male-female dynamic, and what is the meaning of life. Great pop song structure and melody that does a Phil-Collins-special for the lyric, again, namely worshiping the relationship itself instead of The One who made the two people in the relationship in the first place, and contemplating the whole meaning of it all and life in general. 05. "That's Rock'n'Roll" - Classic rock and roll song, with one of the all-time great choruses. I never get tired of this one. Like the spirited live take. Lots of grit in the vocal and guitar for this live performance. Very cool. Other than that, get a haircut dude, my scalp feels sweaty just looking at him, ha ha. 06. "She Remembered" - Guess everyone hopes they're not forgotten from a past relationship that meant a lot to them, whatever type of relationship it was. Captures the sentiment well. 07. "Never Gonna Fall In Love" - Probably one of the best songs ever describing how a heartache feels, to the degree that I can excuse any of the touchy-feely sentimentality for this one. 08. "Sunrise" - Kind of reminds me of "Tightrope", with the majestic intro breaking into a cool rocker. Always liked this song, goes down like a hopeful prayer. Fantastic bridge, and can hear the classical touches in it, adds to it a lot. Nice spirited outro. Star Rating: 4.3 out of 5 Prime Cuts: "All By Myself", "Never Gonna Fall in Love Again", "That's Rock and Roll", and "Sunrise" (guess I must be a big fan of the self-title album! ha ha) Bottom Line: One of the all-time great pop-rock writers and vocalists, as showcased by these songs. Thanks platypus, really enjoyed playing these; even for any gripes about the "not quite getting the full picture" of 2, 3, 4, and 6, they were still very fun and engaging tracks. Will mark you down for the next open spot! Jim - - - - unomusette Sep 3, 2016 at 5:39pm Yet another artist I've heard one or two songs by, years ago. Let's see what he's been getting up to: All By Myself - I do like this song, I remember it being very big when I was in my mid-teens so there's a nostalgia factor. Plus when you're that age this kind of angst is right up your street. Apparently it's based on something classical, that could be a reason it's so memorable, plus there's a masterful overdone ending which Barry Manilow would be taking notes about. Hungry Eyes - This has the chimey '80's keyboard sound that is one of my pet hates so I'm disposed not to like it right away. He sings really well on it though and it's quite meaty-sounding. Make Me Lose Control - Generic '80's rock/pop, nice enough of its type but a bit too smooth/bland for these ears. Almost Paradise - That keyboard sound again The song also sounds typical of that era and very much "soundtrack" material. Not doing much for me. That's Rock'n'Roll - Brings ELO very much to mind as it kicks off, something like Showdown. The intro is a bit too long, get on with it, Eric! He's in good voice when he does get around to it though. Nice enough song, not earth shattering but definitely better than Almost Paradise. She Remembered - This is the kind of song I usually expect to hear from Eric, a bit soppy and with over-the-top production. I reckon he could probably turn out songs like this at the drop of a hat - for me it's not nearly as good as All By Myself but I'm sure fans of the genre would love it. Never Gonna Fall In Love - Erm...no. So sugary it's making my teeth ache. Sunrise - The intro doesn't really have much to do with the song, wonder why it was bolted on? The song is very Beach Boys-alike, but that means it's catchy and cheerful so it's a pleasant listen. I like the way it takes off at the end too, nodding along quite happily to this. The more I saw and heard of Eric here, the more he reminded me of Mika, he looks a bit like him for a start and he's plainly pretty talented if you're into his style of pop music. For me though Mika is the winner - his lyrics are better, he has more of a sense of humour and doesn't appear to take himself nearly as seriously. I'm glad I had the chance to hear a bit more of Eric's stuff though, thanks for sharing Platypus - - - - jrmugz Sep 4, 2016 at 12:30pm Hey dillwyn, you're up for "of the week"! Jim - - - - queenofthehours Sep 16, 2016 at 11:50am 1. All By Myself - I know this, I like it a lot. Along with the similar sounding Nilsson track 'Without You' the radio can't play this enough. Based on Rachmaninov's Piano Concerto number 2 apparently, aka the Brief Encounter theme tune. 2. Hungry Eyes - I knew this one but didn’t think Eric'd done it. I thought someone totally different had, someone like Hall and Oats, not that I know their work. A great pop song. One of those random ones you sing in the supermarket. 3. Make Me Lose Control - I don't know this, it's good but not as immediate. I could listen to this thought, I wouldn't turn off the radio. Maybe it sounds a bit Balance of Power? But without the magic ingredients. 4. Almost Paradise - Getting dangerously close to the kind of 80s music I don’t like . This pases, just! 5. That's Rock'n'Roll - I like this one but it might benefit for being live. A good tune, I don't know what it reminds me of. 6. She Remembered - Perfectly pleasant. One of the best sounding, I like it. 7. Never Gonna Fall In Love - Another based on Rachmaninov, Eric really likes him! Not sure if I'm happy with what he’s done with it or not as I love Sergei and that symphony in particular. Jaunty, anyhow. 8. Sunrise - Sounds a bit at the start like 'Secret Messages' or something. Not a bad rack, Eric really likes that piano stuff. Nice guitar. I really enjoyed finding out about Eric Carmen, I didn't know many of songs before.
  12. HBD...Vincent...When you and I take the White House, things will be different around here... I remain, your running mate and future moderator...Lew
  13. What a great informative fun piece...Good job, Kirk digging this one out... I never stopped to think if the 8-track had the “scratch and sniff” also...
  14. I’m sure Bernie will quote page and paragraph from Marathon Man where this is mentioned but thus may be the first time I heard of this ladies name... About 21 monthly listeners Having just begun singing jazz professionally in 1998, Karen Shane is already making her mark with her first album It's Anybody's Spring, issued in the same year. The road which took her to a career in jazz was not always as clearly marked as it is today. Her initial vocalizing efforts began in 1967 when Shane was still in high school. She hooked up with Eric Carmen forming a local group which sang the music of the Beatles, Byrds, Jefferson Airplane and other rock heroes of the 1960s generation. Moving to Los Angeles in 1970, she backed up Donna Capers at a local venue, the Troubadour, and did some background vocals... https://open.spotify.com/artist/57PU8nbU8mAiRaVN0b1KvK
  15. https://www.musicnotes.com/sheetmusic/mtd.asp?ppn=MN0125619#ProductDetails
  16. As an addendum, I failed to mention that Eric has called John Waite and they will be recording “Missing You” and dedicating it to our buddy, Muzza...
  17. https://bestclassicbands.com/andy-cahan-book-most-famous-musician-harry-nilsson-4-17-200/ mans mire on the book/author... http://www.allentertainment.net/index.html
  18. https://www.iheart.com/podcast/1248-booker-stryker-95279935/episode/paul-mccartney-talks-billie-eilish-the-96884901/?keyid[0]=Booker %26 Stryker Podcast&keyid[1]=Paul McCartney Talks Billie Eilish%2C The Killers%2C Modern Music And More&sc=podcast_widget
  19. Great job, Matt...Two things I always said.,.I love the mono mixes of the earlier Beatle stuff rather than the stereo...They sound so much fuller... And I could never understand the “Rock and Roll” album cover...It looked like a 50’s motif rather than the ‘60’s...
  20. The Beatles song that saw George Harrison invent a new chord Sam Kemp TUE 10TH MAY 2022 23.00 BST 1966 was a watershed moment for The Beatles. Having exhausted themselves with a relentless schedule, the group decided that the best thing they could do was take a well-deserved break, leave behind those endless stretches of tarmac and haul up in Abbey Road Studios. It would prove to be a career-defining move. The album they came out with, Revolver, featured some of John Lennon, Paul McCartney and George Harrison’s finest songwriting, marking a huge development in their sonic and lyrical approaches. In a way, Revolver served as an antidote to a burgeoning sense that somewhere along the road The Beatles had wandered astray. In 1987, George Harrison explained that the group’s popularity eventually stopped them from progressing as musicians. “We became popular, and all this stuff happened where we sang the same songs a lot, we still had a laugh, it was still good fun though,” the guitarist said. “But you know the-that side of it, of playing like as a musician lost the edge there because we just played the same tunes that we play recorded, go around the world singing the same ten songs and every year, we’d lose one and add a new one, and it got a bit boring being fab.” The group’s decision to stop touring allowed them the opportunity to refocus their attention on what really mattered. As Harrison told Guitar World in 1992, this led to a heightened awareness of their craft. “We just became more conscious of so many things,” he said. “We even listened deeper, somehow. That’s when I really enjoyed getting creative with the music-not just with my guitar playing and songwriting but with everything we did as a band, including the songs that the others wrote. It all deepened and became more meaningful.” With Harrison’s mentor Ravi Shanker guiding him towards a new sensitivity to the connection between spirituality and music-making, the songs came thick and fast, many of which Harrison bought to the table when The Beatles sat down to record Revolver. One of his favourites was ‘I Want To Tell You’. According to the musician, it signified not only an evolution in his own songwriting but an explosive development in rock music as a whole. Regarding the track, Guitar World pointed out how it “marked a turning point in your playing and the history of rock music writing. There’s a weird, jarring chord at the end of every line that mirrors the disturbed feeling of the song. Everybody does that today, but that was the first time we’d heard that in a rock song.” Harrison responded: “I’m really pleased that you noticed that. That’s an E7th with an F on the top, played on the piano. I’m really proud of that because I literally invented that chord,” the guitarist said. “The song was about the frustration we all feel about trying to communicate certain things with just words. I realised the chords I knew at the time just didn’t capture that feeling. So after I got the guitar riff, I experimented until I came up with this dissonant chord that really echoed that sense of frustration.” Harrison’s chord was later adopted by John Lennon, who used it during the creation of Abbey Road. “If you listen to ‘I Want You (She’s So Heavy),’ Harrison continued, “It’s right after John sings ‘it’s driving me mad!’ To my knowledge, there’s only been one other song where somebody copied that chord – ‘Back on the Chain Gang’ by the Pretenders.” All these years later, ‘I Want To Tell You’ sounds blisteringly fresh. Blending highly melodic and atonal passages, the track sits somewhere between a piece of Byrds-esque jangle-pop and a twelve-tone composition by Schoneberg, Ligeti or Messaien. It’s mesmerising, perplexing and utterly unlike anything else of the era. No wonder George was so proud.
  21. Nice to see you, Paperdoll...I have been reformed...I actually had joined the priesthood, but I had to quit because I had dyslexia...I was changing the wine back into water...I was so confused and I liked little girls... As for James, grrrrr... Please stay and become a regular again...You were a favorite around here...
  22. https://www.countryliving.com/life/travel/g3468/most-beautiful-places-in-america/?utm_source=facebook_arb&utm_medium=cpm&utm_campaign=arb_fb_clv_m_i_g3468&fbclid=IwAR2I1MzQ19PKXxU9szRjUJHQOgY4M4wD3oqBM5ZicOja14NkQSx09CABCR4
  23. https://www.elledecor.com/life-culture/travel/g18925470/most-famous-hotel-every-state/?utm_source=facebook_arb&utm_medium=cpm&utm_campaign=arb_fb_eld_m_ios_g18925470&fbclid=IwAR3gbSSrHDYFeqHUt5NZMdDdyOAf20mKBceqcbHlXqBG6Gt35ozohGoYd9Y
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