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Lew Bundles

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About Lew Bundles

  • Birthday 12/28/1953

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  • Favorite Eric Carmen Album
    I'm Through With Lew
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  1. But I can’t figure it out… https://www.besteveralbums.com/thechart.php?b=30057#appearances
  2. https://www.yahoo.com/entertainment/every-david-bowie-album-ranked-162958753.html
  3. Best places to live in the U.S.2022… https://www.cbsnews.com/et-pictures/best-places-live-united-states-america/?ftag=ACQ0534a8f&fbclid=IwAR2oOxYGKFjK5K9t5kFNBl742KD2UkJgHj2usQrsMg0W1zF7kUuFx3uM4Pc#app
  4. https://www.yahoo.com/entertainment/beach-boys-al-jardine-sounds-154522728.html
  5. https://ifmyrecordscouldtalk.com/2019/06/05/kiss-my-butt-i-love-the-raspberries/amp/
  6. I didn’t have to revisit the soundtrack to know its highs and lows. These songs are forever lurking in my mental substrate. Some for better, some for worse. So, here’s my ranking of the album’s tracks, from favored last dance picks to the tracks that belong, eternally, in a corner: 1. “Be My Baby,” The Ronettes Film trivia: Along with Dirty Dancing, what other American cinema classic has an opening scene set to “Be My Baby?” Mean Streets! It’s hard to think of two more temperamentally opposed films, but the Ronettes put the pedal down on both. And it works beautifully both times. Those opening drum blasts and Ronnie Spector’s booming voice have such a sense of promise and possibility to them — it’s the start of summer, it’s the sun coming up, it’s an exemplary lead-off song. 2. “Overload,” Alfie Zappacosta “Overload” is ridiculous and I love it. Zappacosta sings in a goofy macho belch, like he’s thinking about absolutely crushing some bicep curls as soon as he’s through with the song. It kills me, and the sparse drum beat and guitar wriggles during the chorus are weirdly cool and minimal. If Rambo-era Sylvester Stallone made music, it’d sound like this. 3. “Love Is Strange,” Mickey & Sylvia The opening guitar licks are tersely funky and culminate on an awesome broke-note fill. The song’s spoken duet part (“Hey, Sylvia?”) never stops being adorable either. Sylvia’s delivery has an acid sassiness that keeps the song from getting too sweet. 4. “Hey! Baby,” Bruce Channel A No. 1 single in 1961, this song — an amiable Buddy Holly-esque lope — features harmonica so bright and playful and carefree the Grinch could get with it. 5. “Stay,” Maurice Williams and the Zodiacs When whichever Zodiac is responsible swoops into his falsetto, it’s impossible not to smile. Even if Williams and Co. intend something lascivious (it’s creepy to convince a girl to hang around by saying her “Mommy” and “Daddy” won’t mind), there’s a buoyancy to the sound that’s irresistable. And the rhythm has a nice lulling Latin lilt. 6. “Hungry Eyes,” Eric Carmen Eric Carmen’s career is a strange one. In the early ’70s, he fronted beloved power-poppers the Raspberries, who were punchy and tough and clever. Then the group broke-up (they’d later reunite), and in 1975 he had a gloopy hit with “All By Myself.” After that he transformed himself into a total softy. “Hungry Eyes” is MOR-ballad Carmen, but the rasp he gives to the line “I feel the magic between you and I” still gets me. Bro’s a pro. 7. “(I’ve Had) The Time of My Life,” Bill Medley and Jennifer Warnes Medley and Warnes both have lovely voices, and the melody soars (in a seatbelts-on kind of way), but — and this is a hindsight issue and not the song’s fault — this joint sounds like the blueprint for the music in every erectile dysfunction commercial. Can’t fault the arrangement, though. This song starts limp, then rises, and rises, and climaxes into the chorus. Multiple times. 8. “In the Still of the Night,” The Five Satins A go-to for signifying pre-Beatles rock, this is a perfect doo-wop song. The undying backing sho-doop, sho-be doops, the swooning melody, the unexpected string plinks, that cottony saxophone. Pass me a malt soda and let me look at the stars. 9. “Yes,” Merry Clayton This is bouncy, frothy soul-pop that would’ve been a solid cut on an ’80s Aretha Franklin album. It’s also the second-best thing Clayton ever did. The best? Her wailing backing vocals on the Rolling Stones’ “Gimme Shelter.” 10. “She’s Like the Wind,” Patrick Swayze There’s definitely a soft-core 50 Shades of Grey appeal about the track’s plush ambience, but man oh man, Swayze sings like he’s working through an acting exercise or something. Like someone said to him that he should sing like his loins are on fire, but nobody else is allowed to know because HE IS SECRETLY IN LOVE WITH A RICH GIRL BUT HE’S FROM THE WRONG SIDE OF THE TRACKS AND IT’LL NEVER WORK! OH THE SIMMERING PASSION! 11. “Where Are You tonight?” Tom Johnston Sub-Huey Lewis. Still, you could imagine a normally buttoned-down uncle very much enjoying this song if it was played by a live band at a wedding. But has any genre aged more poorly than ’80s blue-eyed soul? 12. “You Don’t Own Me,” The Blow Monkeys This song gives me the creeps. The lead singer does a vague Bowie impression, but without any of the Thin White Duke’s sense of desiccated grandeur he just sounds overwrought. The sax honks, but not hard enough. The strings are synthetic and thin; the drums cold. The chorus is catchy, but the production, the attitude, is flimsy and dated — two things that, 25 years later, Dirty Dancing is most definitely not. David Marchese https://www.spin.com/2012/09/dirty-dancing-25-anniversary-patrick-swayze-soundtrack/
  7. https://www.scribd.com/book/206606094/Eric-Carmen-Marathon-Man
  8. Or Not sure if these were posted before…
  9. I’m glad you enjoyed this Dar.,,I’m sure you can use the giggle…
  10. https://amp.smh.com.au/entertainment/music/dag-ometer-proves-it-schmaltz-is-out-20070711-gdql6o.html This was published 14 years ago Dag-ometer proves it: schmaltz is out By Erik Jensen July 11, 2007 — 10.00am THERE is a reason why some people gag at Barbra Streisand songs and Barry Manilow can chase teenagers out of car parks, a Sydney academic has found. A University of NSW music psychologist Emery Schubert argues these responses are caused by a differential affect gap (DAG) - a discrepancy between the emotion expressed in a song and the emotion felt by the listener. His research found young listeners placed a 57 per cent gap between their emotions and the emotions in Eric Carmen's 1998 schmaltz-fest I was Born to Love You, but only a 4 per cent gap between their emotions and John Butler Trio's Pickapart. "What we found was that when there was a large gap between felt and expressed emotion, music was liked less," Dr Schubert said. "This is a new finding - no one's ever actually used this scale before." The scale comes from asking people to plot their emotions while listening to a piece of music, using the four points of dimensional emotion: valence, arousal, emotional strength and dominance. "People like a small gap between felt and expressed emotion, a small differential affect gap. [The research] identifies a new method for rating musical preference through an implicit method," he said. But the formula will not replace radio station music directors. "It's too hard to program a station like that. You don't know where people are, or how they're feeling," the program director at WSFM, Charlie Fox, said. While unconvinced by the science of the findings, record company talent scout Matt O'Connor said the theory of emotional congruity was something he used. "It's not a formula. It's about a great song with a great melody content and a great emotional content," he said. The key factor influencing people's appreciation of music is familiarity, although Dr Schubert said about 25 per cent of the response was from the DAG factor. "What this DAG factor is doing, it doesn't say that a piece needs a lot of emotion, just that the emotion needs to match that of the listener to cash in on that 25 per cent. That's the new factor," he said. His findings, based on almost six years' research, will be published in British science journal Psychology of Music
  11. I actually preferred Duvall as Tom Hagen…
  12. I didn’t mean to imply this was imminent..,Just starting to think about retirement for the first time in my life…Never did before…
  13. Best places to retire in Fla. https://www.floridaforboomers.com/25-most-popular-retirement-cities/?utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=cpc&utm_campaign=25-best-places&fbclid=IwAR093spvnSLP2a0cxwsnpc_ywJHT3R3zrcM-l24H0qKl9siFizbPl3M-MpM
  14. Board Top 40 Music on Compact Disc : Chat Board Topic: Raspberries "Overnight Sensation" Author Message<< Prev Topic | Next Topic >> EdisonLite MusicFan Joined: 18 October 2004 Location: United States Online Status: Offline Posts: 1998 Posted: 20 February 2006 at 11:01am | IP Logged Can anyone explain the difference between the 5:24 single version and the 5:34 album version? Where is the 10 seconds that is edited out of the LP version? EdisonLite MusicFan Joined: 18 October 2004 Location: United States Online Status: Offline Posts: 1998 Posted: 21 June 2006 at 4:25pm | IP Logged I can now answer my own question in case anyone is wondering this. Both versions are identical up until the 5:24 point where the song fades out to zero. After that, on the album version, you hear about 10 seconds of "Go All the Way" at an extremely low volume. Pat, you might want to mention this detail in the database (if it's not already indicated.) I bought the "Greatest" CD just to get this longer version, thinking it was a different mix or an edit or a longer fade, only to find out I already had the full-length song in tact but not the "Go All the Way" coda (which I didn't need.) IMO, these two versions could also be differentiated by labeling one "album length" and one "single length" -- since you can fade the album really really quickly at 5:24 and get the single. Edited by EdisonLite on 21 June 2006 at 4:27pm eriejwg MusicFan Joined: 10 June 2007 Location: United States Online Status: Offline Posts: 3272 Posted: 26 December 2007 at 1:11am | IP Logged Revisiting an old topic if you don't mind... A seller has a 5:24/3:46 promo for sale. Before I'd sink $15.60 into this (yes, expensive), does anyone know how to edit the 45 version down to 3:46? AndrewChouffi MusicFan Joined: 24 September 2005 Online Status: Offline Posts: 953 Posted: 26 December 2007 at 8:24am | IP Logged For "eriejwg": Going by memory only, the 3:46 promo is just an early fade of the 5:24. For "EdisonLite": Don't forget that the album version is a slightly different mix than the single (single mix is narrower stereo and a little more midrangey and a little less dynamic than the album version). Andy Yah Shure MusicFan Joined: 11 December 2007 Location: United States Online Status: Offline Posts: 1309 Posted: 26 December 2007 at 11:14am | IP Logged Andy, there's an edit involved along with the early fade. With my DJ 45 serving as the template, here's how I replicated the short version: Using the 45 mix from the Capitol Collectors Series CD, the edit point comes at the 3:17 mark, just before the word "hit" of the first complete "want a hit record, yeah" line after the drums come in. The segment between 3:17 and just before the word "hit" at the 4:22 mark is simply edited out. After making the edit, fade beginning at 3:35. The last full word heard before the end of the fade is "record" at the 3:46 mark. Edited by Yah Shure on 26 December 2007 at 11:18am eriejwg MusicFan Joined: 10 June 2007 Location: United States Online Status: Offline Posts: 3272 Posted: 26 December 2007 at 11:20am | IP Logged To Andy and Yah Sure...many thanks! And, my wallet thanks you too! AndrewChouffi MusicFan Joined: 24 September 2005 Online Status: Offline Posts: 953 Posted: 26 December 2007 at 12:13pm | IP Logged Thanks "Yah Shure" Memories are a foggy thing... Maybe the radio station that played it in my area simply faded the long version out before the solo piano part & wasn't the TRUE promo edit... Andy Yah Shure MusicFan Joined: 11 December 2007 Location: United States Online Status: Offline Posts: 1309 Posted: 26 December 2007 at 12:52pm | IP Logged Eriejwg, you and your wallet are most welcome! Andy, you're spot-on regarding foggy memories. I dug out all of my Raspberries 45s a month ago when they came up for discussion during the 2007 IT thread on xmfan.com's decades discussion. In scanning all of the labels for a future post, I realized that I hadn't played the short "Overnight Sensation" 45 in many years, and that's what sparked the replication effort. And just has you had thought, I went in with the assumption that there was just an early fade. It was the differences in the drumming that made the edit apparent. Most casual listeners would never have noticed the difference between the actual DJ 45 edit and a simple early fade. I wouldn't rule out the possibility that your local station did their own early fade. If they wore out their initial promo 45, all they would have had left were either the long promo side or reserviced stock copies. The single preceded the release of the Starting Over album. EdisonLite MusicFan Joined: 18 October 2004 Location: United States Online Status: Offline Posts: 1998 Posted: 27 December 2007 at 1:41am | IP Logged Andrew C writes: <For "EdisonLite": Don't forget that the album version is a slightly different mix than the single (single mix is narrower stereo and a little more midrangey and a little less dynamic than the album version). > When the piano solo fades (prior to the big drums crash that comes back in), does it get quieter on one version while staying somewhat louder on the other version? (I thought I recall a difference being that one faded closer to "zero" than the other did.) AndrewChouffi MusicFan Joined: 24 September 2005 Online Status: Offline Posts: 953 Posted: 27 December 2007 at 8:39pm | IP Logged Both single & album mixes have the piano solo quite quietly mixed; I believe the single mix piano sounds a tad louder, but probably that's due to the overall more midrangey sound of the single mix. Andy edtop40 MusicFan Joined: 29 October 2004 Location: United States Online Status: Offline Posts: 4958 Posted: 01 April 2012 at 4:13am | IP Logged my 45 states the run time on the label as 5:34 but only runs 5:21 and is identical to the version from the below cd..... (S) (5:20) &nb sp; Arista 18963 Eric Carmen -- The Definitive Collection (45 version) __________________ edtop40
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