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i've read several references in recent years to what was supposed to have been a fantastic Raspberries concert at MSG in NYC back in the day. was there any video or audio documentation of this performance? if not, did anyone on these mssg boards happen to be at that show & have any feedback (pun intended) on the experience?

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I believe the concert was Carnegie Hall, not Madison Square Garden. As I have heard, the group was going to record the show, had everything all set to do so, and was stopped prior to it by some union issue and it was never taped.

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That Carnegie Hall concert is the stuff of legend. Check out the reviews that Bernie has saved for us in the press archives here at EC.COM. The story I heard was that everything was set and they were ready to record, but at the last minute someone made them unplug and stop because some "permit" was not pulled in advance. For the sake of a lousy permit, one of the greatest pieces of musical history was lost to the wind.

Though I was not there, the stories I have heard and read about the quality of that show lead me to believe that our favorite bands career and history may have been far more successful with the release of that live concert.

Sometimes it seems that these guys really were "boats against the current"... frown

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mr jason   

It was actually Wally, who had his 4 track recorder setup in the first few rows of the audience, with Jimmy Ienner and Shelly Yakus ready to press record, if I remember rightly from the book.. He was told that he couldn't record cos he didn't have the appropriate permit, and he even offered to buy the permit, but yeah, as pointed out, they wouldn't let him buy the permit!

Rediculous!

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ok, right, it must've been carnegie hall, not MSG. pauliemississippi, can you post the link to the reviews to which you refer, so i dont have to hunt? thx!

I was looking around the site but didn't find it. I'm sure Bernie probably has easier ways to pull a link on this stuff... Right Bernie? wink

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For some reason, the review is missing from the PRESS ARCHIVE here at EC.COM, bot anyone who has a copy of Marathon Man can read it there as well as see a RARE photo of the band on stage at Carnegie Hall! Until Ken and I discovered that photo, an image from that night had never been seen before!

Bernie

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Bernie,

In that photo (p. 146) notice that the Raspberries logo is missing from Jim's bass drum. That's the way it was when I saw them two months later, too.

And on that riser, the Raspberries sign on the front lit up to flash "Raspberries" (I believe it was synched with the bass drum) when I saw the band two months after Carnegie Hall. I was glad to see that pic in the book --- it's hard to describe that setup without people seeing what it looked like.

Don smile

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I see the Record World review by Allen Levy from October 6, 1973 in Bernie and Ken's book. There were also reviews in Phongraph Record Magazine (by Alan Betrock), The Village Voice (October 4, 1973), Cash Box (Oct. 20, 1973), Billboard (Oct. 13, 1973, and in a few other publications.

The Carnegie Hall program for the show is reprinted as pages 220 to 222 of Ken Sharp's 350-page book, "Overnight Sensation: The Story Of The Raspberries." The book is listed for sale in the Raspberries merchandise section at http://www.raspberriesonline.com/store.shtml .

The reviews I noted above are reprinted in that book, too.

Some quotes from those reviews about that Carnegie Hall gig:

"...Raspberries brought the audience to their feet, caused screams of delight to issue from young nubile throats, caused even jaded rock critics to get up and boogie. Lord, Raspberries are good. And fun!..." --- Allen Levy, Record World.

"...They were confident but not cocky, and let their music do their talking for them - it rang out loud and clear.... Wally was the one who impressed me most. Somehow on record he just doesn't come across too powerfully, but onstage he's as charismatic a rocker as I've seen in a long time... The Raspberries are living proof that the music that so many of us (and the group) cherish can be brought to life vitally and powerfully..." --- Alan Betrock, Phonograph Record Magazine.

"...The instant the Raspberries hit the stage it was 1965 again..." --- Dan Nooger, The Village Voice.

"...Raspberries bounced on stage with 'teen idol' Eric Carmen leading the way. In opening with a rather cutely sarcastic 'Ticket To Ride' (folks have always compared the group to the mid sixties Beatles), the group, in slick precision, sequed into their second single 'I Wanna Be With You.' The crowd was captured right then and there. The rest of the evening was Raspberry fever with 'Let's Pretend,' 'On The Beach,' 'Tonight,' 'Go All The Way' (their incredible single smash) and 'Drivin' Around' most noticeably raising Carnegie's temperature..." --- Cash Box.

"...Raspberries was something else - a band much tougher than the name might imply...the Capitol recording group brought back an era of music free of excess and full of exhuberance... Focal point Eric Carmen, a McCartney-esque look and soundalike, who sings, plays rhythm guitar and piano, is quite adept at stirring up a crowd..." --- Billboard.

And one from an unidentified local paper a week after the show (p. 224 of Ken's book): "...Appearing in matching black satin jackets, they immediately had the young girls going crazy; the word about them being The Beatles incarnate is true. Not only does havoc break out in the audience at the mere mention of their names, but they even start their set with 'Ticket To Ride.' They stop mid-way through the song though, and take a second to soak up the adulation and gloat over their accomplishment - the expressions of the people in the audience now resemble various states of shock, as if they were witnessing the Second Coming... girls running exstatically down the aisles to get close to the stage, exhuberantly waving their arms and pulling on their hair..."

Now that last one, ladies and gentlemen, was a fine description of Raspberrymania!

Don smile

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The licensing fees we had to pay to reprint that single Carnegie Hall photo in Marathon Man was $ky high! You'll never see it anwhere else besides in that book. By the way, the coolest part of the photo is that it matches Eric's oft told tale about how the band looked, what they wore and the idea behind the "Ticket To Ride" Beatles opener. Wow!

Bernie

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Don,

Now I remember why the Carnegie review isn't at EC.COM—back when I was building the PRESS ARCHIVE here I made a conscious decision not to copy anything from Ken's book. I only included articles I personally owned. Since Ken's book was still on sale, I wanted to make sure everyone bought a book instead of just getting all of the articles for free here!

Bernie

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Don,

Now I remember why the Carnegie review isn't at EC.COM—back when I was building the PRESS ARCHIVE here I made a conscious decision not to copy anything from Ken's book. I only included articles I personally owned. Since Ken's book was still on sale, I wanted to make sure everyone bought a book instead of just getting all of the articles for free here!

Bernie

That's also one of the reasons why I didn't quote the entire articles here, too, Bernie, even though they also appeared on the inner sleeve of the "Raspberries Best Featuring Eric Carmen" LP back in 1976. The quotes should be enticement enough to buy Ken's 350-page monument to the band (which includes rare photos of Wally Bryson with Pete Townshend, The Choir (Wally, Dave, Jim) with The Yardbirds (Jimmy Page), and Eric and Wally with Keith Moon). Everyone should be aware that the first printing of Ken's book sold out in 1993 (I bought five of the 1,000 copies printed) and when the latest printing is gone, who knows? Buy it now, folks!

Don Krider smile

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