Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Lew Bundles

N.Y. Times Lukewarm Review

Recommended Posts

Raspberries Band Offers Pop‐pourri At the Bottom Line

By John Rockwell

Raspberries is a young rock band whose four members come mostly from Cleveland. They didn't make much of an impact until this year, after two former members were replaced. But their fourth album, produced by Jimmy Ienner, has attracted a lot of attention, and Thursday night they opened a four‐night run at the Bottom Line, their first New York appearances since the personnel changes.

It was a little disappointing, in comparison with the album. Mr. Ienner has surrounded the four—Eric Carmen, Wally Bryson, Scott McCarl and Mike McBride—with a tricky yet effectively discreet assortment of instrumental touches and clever arrangements. The result is a pop‐pourri of nineteen‐fiftees, sixties and seventies influences, fused into something fresh and appealing.

It is a verity in the pop‐music world that complex studio arrangements are difficult to reproduce in live concert, and Raspberries hadn't solved the problem on Thursday.

They seemed content to settle for soulful folkishness from Mr. Carmen at the piano and, most of the time, solidly hard‐driving rock. The rock is decent enough of its kind, although the inexorability of the beat sounds more leadenly monolithic than enlivening. Raspberries is obviously a band with a future. But in concert at least, that future still seems a little way off.

—The New York Times, Dec. 14, 1974

  • Confused 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Those that can't do...review.

"The Beatles’ vocal quality can be described as hoarsely incoherent, with the minimal enunciation necessary to communicate the schematic texts."
— The New York Times, Feb. 10, 1964

"With their bizarre shrubbery, the Beatles are obviously a press agent’s dream combo. Not even their mothers would claim that they sing well. But the hirsute thickets they affect make them rememberable, and they project a certain kittenish charm which drives the immature, shall we say, ape."
— The Los Angeles Times, Feb. 11, 1964

"Visually they are a nightmare, tight, dandified Edwardian-Beatnik suits and great pudding bowls of hair. Musically they are a near disaster, guitars and drums slamming out a merciless beat that does away with secondary rhythms, harmony and melody. Their lyrics (punctuated by nutty shouts of “yeah, yeah, yeah”) are a catastrophe, a preposterous farrago of Valentine-card romantic sentiments."
— Newsweek, Feb. 24, 1964

"Just thinking about the Beatles seems to induce mental disturbance. They have a commonplace, rather dull act that hardly seems to merit mentioning, yet people hereabouts have mentioned scarcely anything else for a couple of days."
— The Washington Post, Feb. 13, 1964

:lol:

Bernie

  • Haha 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Raspbernie said:

Those that can't do...review.

"The Beatles’ vocal quality can be described as hoarsely incoherent, with the minimal enunciation necessary to communicate the schematic texts."
— The New York Times, Feb. 10, 1964

"With their bizarre shrubbery, the Beatles are obviously a press agent’s dream combo. Not even their mothers would claim that they sing well. But the hirsute thickets they affect make them rememberable, and they project a certain kittenish charm which drives the immature, shall we say, ape."
— The Los Angeles Times, Feb. 11, 1964

"Visually they are a nightmare, tight, dandified Edwardian-Beatnik suits and great pudding bowls of hair. Musically they are a near disaster, guitars and drums slamming out a merciless beat that does away with secondary rhythms, harmony and melody. Their lyrics (punctuated by nutty shouts of “yeah, yeah, yeah”) are a catastrophe, a preposterous farrago of Valentine-card romantic sentiments."
— Newsweek, Feb. 24, 1964

"Just thinking about the Beatles seems to induce mental disturbance. They have a commonplace, rather dull act that hardly seems to merit mentioning, yet people hereabouts have mentioned scarcely anything else for a couple of days."
— The Washington Post, Feb. 13, 1964

:lol:

Bernie

And then, two “doers”, Aaron Copeland and Leonard Bernstein pointed out to the world that the Beatles were actually quite good.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Funny picture of”doer”...Bernstein actually called the Beatles the “Schubert’s of their time”...

Leonard Bernstein shielding his ears from the screams at a Beatles concert, 1965

Post image
 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this  

×