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HT from Mo

Hard To Get Over A Heartbreak

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Having three of the four albums in front of me, this is what is listed.

1 album: Raspberries - Waiting, I can remember and Go all the way written and lead performed by EC.

I saw the light, written by EC and WB, lead sung by EC.

With you in my life and Come around and see me, written by WB and lead sung by WB.

Don't want to say goodbye, written by EC and WB, lead sung by WB, EC joins in later.

Get it Moving and Rock n Roll mama written and lead sung by DS.

2 album: Fresh, I wanna be with you, Let's pretend, I reach for the light,If you change your mind, all written and lead sung by EC.

Nobody Knows and Drivin Around written by EC and DS, lead performed by EC.

Might as well written and sung lead by WB.

Every Way I Can written and sung lead by DS.

Going nowhere tonight and It Seemed So Easy written by DS and EC, lead done by DS.

4th album: Starting Over- Starting Over, Overnight Sensation, Cruisin Music, and I don't know what i want all written and lead sung by EC.

Play on and Cry written by EC and SM, leads performed by Scott.

Hands on you written by WB and SM, leads from both WB and Scott.

Party's over written and lead performed by WB.

Rose Coloured Glasses, written by and lead by Scott.

I Can Hardly Believe You're Mine written by EC and Scott, lead sung by EC.

All through the Night written by EC and Mike McBride, lead sung by EC.

Deb - PA Steeler Fan

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You know, when it comes to choosing favorite songs, it always comes down to personal taste. I was never much of a fan of George Harrison's songs ( up until Abbey Road ) but I know an awful lot of people who just LOVED George's songs. When I write, I usually have a particular "sound" in mind. I think Wally and Dave are more "organic" writers. They just kind of write what comes out, and think about arrangements later. I tailored my songs very specifically to take advantage of each bandmember's strong points. Wally has such a strong style, both vocally and as a guitarist, it would have been silly for me not to consider those things when I was writing. I think Scott thought about writing very much the way I did. ec

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LC   
James said:

...and good point Mr. E about the chemistry.

Yep, great point about the chemistry. In fact, it IS the point.... The variety within those four albums is a big part of what makes this band's music stand out...

My list is shorter than yours, James, and different than others who responded. In fact, I might put only "With You in My Life" as a not-good-to-great tune --- but I know others who dig it.

On the other hand, I've thought "Money Down" was cool from the first time I heard it ("Let a woman think I got a heart of stone/I just wanna love 'em and leave 'em alone").... And "Cry" has that slow-and-fast-tempo thing that makes it so memorable....

Yep, everyone will have a different take on the one or two or three songs in the 'berries catalog that aren't top-of-the-line quality, but it seems like everyone here, if we were teachers grading the catalog, would give it a solid 95%-98%. And there ain't too many bands you can say that about. (Or, to be grammatically correct, albeit clunky: "There aren't too many bands about which you can say that.")

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LC   
Eric Carmen said:

You know, when it comes to choosing favorite songs, it always comes down to personal taste. I was never much of a fan of George Harrison's songs ( up until Abbey Road ) but I know an awful lot of people who just LOVED George's songs. ec

The cool thing about George as a Beatle is hearing his evolution, starting with the first songs he wrote. On earlier albums, he'd have things like "You Like Me Too Much" sharing space with instant Lennon & McCartney classics like "I've Just Seen a Face," "Ticket to Ride," and "It's Only Love." Trying to keep up with John and Paul during that era must have been tough! (And intimidating, judging by biographies I've read.)

I thought George really turned the corner with "If I Needed Someone." That's a great song. And even though I wasn't into his Indian-influenced music (esp. on Sgt. Pepper), he really hit his stride with some of his White Album songs and, of course, his Abbey Road gems.

Don't mean to go off on a tangent, but... it's the Beatles!

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Eric Carmen said:

When I write, I usually have a particular "sound" in mind. I think Wally and Dave are more "organic" writers. They just kind of write what comes out, and think about arrangements later. I tailored my songs very specifically to take advantage of each bandmember's strong points. Wally has such a strong style, both vocally and as a guitarist, it would have been silly for me not to consider those things when I was writing. I think Scott thought about writing very much the way I did. ec

Eric, I must confess that I know little of songwriting; I dabble on the lyric side some but as for the music, I just didn't do enough with it when I had the chances. However I do know that there are distinct style differences between certain songwriters just as there are differences between James Patterson and Robert B. Parker novels or Peter David and Steve Gerber scripted comic books.

Part of what has amazed me all these years, and I don't know what percent is motivation and what part inspiration, but you manged to stay pretty true to your quality levels while cranking out more songs than your bandmates combined!

I think that Dave was definitely progressing as a songwriter prior to "split 1" and one of the greatest regrets I have as a fan is that because of "split 2" you and Scott did not get to (or choose to) continue collaborating. As you said, he seemed to be thinking about things in a similar way as you.

As for Wally, I am one of those that loves his rocker stuff... Money Down, Party's Over, (Golden Rule with Sittin' Ducks) but never really got into his "milder" Beatles influenced stuff... That's probably "just me"... but then again, I bet it's not only me... :lol:

For the record, and to keep on topic, I thought Hard To Get Over A Heartbreak was great... even the fade out guitar riffs... Cry, with its opening and closing keyboard bookending an attitude/rocker, love it! If I was forced to pick a Scott song to "throw away" it would be Rose Colored Glasses. To me it just lacks something. The lyrics are good, the music is ok but somehow I think it would have been greatly improved by "the Eric touch..." :cool:

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Well, you know, when Scott brought in "Rose Coloured Glasses" he sang the vocal much more in the vain of John Lennon. As I recall, when we got into the recording studio, Jimmy Ienner felt that he should sing it much softer. I'm not sure Scott was terribly pleased with the outcome. It seemed to make the song more "sacharin" than it was intended to be. ec

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Eric, I also agree. I discovered EricCarmen.com this past March and since then I have been hooked.

I just wanted to take a few minutes to let you how much I have enjoyed your music over the years. For me, it is timeless.

Gotta go, got to ready for the game, my beloved Steelers will be playing in an hour.

Deb - PA Steeler Fan

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Yes it really comes down to a question of taste. Sadly, the Beatles had no room for some other brilliant George tunes also like "All Things Must Pass," and "Sour Milk Sea." The only Beatle songs that irk me are Pauls "lesser" songs. The tin pan alley stuff. I really appreciate the total package of brilliant melody combined with brilliant lyrics. I think Lennon and Harrison were more capable of doing that than McCartney was- although he wrote his fair share of brilliant lyrics too. And I think Harrison could say something very heavy and serious lyrically even in a deeper way than Lennon at times. "While My Guitar Gently Weeps" and " Within You, Without You" are deeply meaningful and wise lyrically- even till today. But it really is a question of taste. Some people love that the Beatles became more avante garde and progressive with time and some people didn't appreciate it so much. Some people didnt like Lennons eventually rawness, some people love it. Apples for some, oranges for others. (no pun with the Apple.)

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Don_Krider said:

"Hard To Get Over A Heartbreak" was written by Dave Smalley alone (RPM "Power Pop Volume 2" incorrectly lists it as written by Eric Carmen).

I just got my Raspberries CD's today and I was just noticing that RPM has Eric listed as the sole writer of "Hard to Get Over a Heartbreak" - is this a continuing trend? I tried to look it up in Bernie & Ken's book but in the "Musical Rorschach" it isn't listed. Just mentioned through the book. Dave is the sole writer for the song - is that correct?

BTW, I've enjoyed every song on all the albums! All this time, I didn't know what I was missing! :):)

HT

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LC   

Misprint! Once a misprint happens, it tends to snowball.... But yeah, "Hard to Get Over a Heartbreak" is a Dave Smalley song.

If you're ever in doubt, just go to Bernie's excellent and thorough Raspberries and EC lyrics pages.... He's got the correct songwriters listed with each song's words.

PS: I still remember buying Side 3, the LP, in college in the late 1970s. Loved it instantly. I remember "On the Beach" standing out back then, and it still does, for reasons that are great memories. What a haunter that one is.... And I love the attitude and guitar in Wally's "Money Down." And Dave's "Should I Wait" sounded like the best Eagles song ever written. And Eric's "Tonight" --- heck, that should have been a #1 hit. But I digress....

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Yes I've seen the lyrics posted on this site - this is where I checked to see if it's correct.

Weird thing is that this song isn't listed in Bernie/Ken's book on Eric in the section"Muscial Rorschach" where Eric gives his opinion on each song that either the Raspberries did or he did in his solo career. I think it was an oversight. No big deal.

Thanks LC.

HT

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HT from Mo said:

Weird thing is that this song isn't listed in Bernie/Ken's book on Eric in the section"Muscial Rorschach" where Eric gives his opinion on each song that either the Raspberries did or he did in his solo career. I think it was an oversight. No big deal.

Muscial Rorschach only included songs Eric wrote, that's why it's not included in that section of Eric Carmen: Marathon Man.

Bernie

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Jenny309   

Eric's song, I CAN REMEMBER, still sends chills everytime I hear it, and "No Eric", the strings R not that flat. U guys recorded in real time, there were no "Pro Tools" in 1972, LOL. Jimmy Ienner melting-in the Electric Guitar to the Strings was really EPIC..at that time. THAT WAS Genius. If you were attempting to emulate Pete Townsend on that song, well you certainly succeeded in my book. Id luv to know your inspiration for I CAN REMEMBER, jen.

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I really can't remember (no pun intended) what my inspiration for "I Can Remember" was. It was probably a combination of things I liked at that moment in time. My best guess is the end of Abbey Road that starts with "Golden Slumbers" might have been the starting point, but I've always liked the idea of combining disparate elements to try to create something new. I wanted the song to be two movements, like a mini-symphony, starting off slow and morphing into the more up-tempo ending. Jen,

My idea was to see if we could cross-fade my piano into Wally's acoustic guitar-through-a-Lesley organ speaker to get to the "second movement". From there it was supposed to take off into sounding a bit more like the Who backing McCartney who's still at the piano. At the chorus, the Beach Boys were supposed to come in singing and then at the very end I wanted Jim to completely let loose like Keith Moon on 'My Generation," while the Beach Boys harmonies continued, Wally slashed out the chords on his 12 string and I attempted to emulate Brian Wilson. No wonder my band thought I was crazy! ec

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LC   

Crazy like a fox! That song is 35 years old and it still sounds fresh. It was a pretty ambitious vision for such a young fella, but it sure worked!

PS: Jen, welcome to the board.... And check out this older thread, from March, where Eric wrote some other reflections of "I Can Remember."

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