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Found 6 results

  1. Spock REALLY Gone? Illogical

    .... but very sadly true. One of the best beloved Science Fiction characters ever invented by Gene Roddenberry BUT brought to life by Mr. Leonard Nimoy who passed away last week. I thought sure there were some Star Trek fans like me, so I thought someone else might have posted this. But no, they may still be tweeting or twatting on twitter, or facing it on facebook with others --- so I will make this brief mention. He was definitely a part of my growing up years. Our family calmed down the daily dysfunctional chaos in front of the one-eyed babysitter (for a family of seven) at least a few times during the week, and especially for Star Trek from the first airing and on through the Saturday morning animated series done as well. Spock was an interestingly done in-depth character, and I personally identified with him more than the other actors or actresses in the series. Logical Spock seemed more logical to me in a home life without much peace in it. So here are two very touching items presented in the media, and if you go to the website I reference, Mr. Nimoy's family were kind enough to give us a small glance into his life with some personal pictures of him with other individuals in the family. AnneNR The Big Bang Theory Paid Tribute To Leonard Nimoy After Tonight's Episode And It Was Beautiful by Lauren Piester Thu., Mar. 5, 2015 8:24 PM PST Leonard Nimoy, also known as Star Trek's incomparable Mr. Spock, always did have a presence on The Big Bang Theory, even when he only ever appeared on the show as a voice in Sheldon's head. It could be argued that Sheldon Cooper wouldn't be Sheldon Cooper without Spock's influence, given the fact that Sheldon related to him more than anyone else. Sheldon dressed up as Spock, he wrote plays about Spock, and once, Nimoy appeared in Sheldon's dream as the voice of a Spock action figure that Sheldon had accidentally broken. Tonight, the series paid tribute to Nimoy with creator Chuck Lorre's vanity card, usually famously reserved for rambling bits of advice or jokes. The image following the end of tonight's episode featured a picture of Nimoy and the words, "The impact you had on our show and on our lives is everlasting." After news of Nimoy's death spread on Friday, some of the Big Bang Theory cast also tweeted their respects. http://www.people.com/article/leonard-nimoy-grandchildren-tribute-pics As the world continues to mourn the death of Leonard Nimoy, his grandchildren Morgan Pearson, 36, Alex Schwartz, 30, Dani Schwartz, 25, Maddy Nimoy, 24, Spencer Schwartz, 23, and Jonah Nimoy, 22, remember the man they called "Poppi" in a tribute written exclusively for PEOPLE: He was a renaissance man. He knew how to do everything from flying a plane to fixing a vacuum to setting up aquariums. Our favorite memory is when he would drive us around on his boat on Lake Tahoe every summer. He would let us each drive the boat, with him right next to us if something went wrong. He would take us river rafting where the ride was so bumpy everyone kept falling out of the boat, but Poppi kept us all safe and kept us cracking up the entire time. He wasn't a huge talker, but he always knew what to say and told us countless stories. He spoke the most about life as an actor before Spock than life in Hollywood. He told us how he didn't have a job that lasted longer than a week before Star Trek. He had an unbelievable memory. Within his home, there wasn't memorabilia everywhere except for in his office. That is where his work memories live. But one of our last conversations with him was him telling us all about directing 3 Men and a Baby. He told us stories we had never heard before about the making of that movie. He was cracking all five of us up. It makes us feel proud that he was so beloved by his peers. There has been an overwhelming response in the past few days and we all couldn't be more thankful and honored. We will always be able to hear his voice in Star Trek episodes, interviews and on his albums. When we're missing our Poppi, we can go watch him online somewhere. That way he never really leaves us.
  2. I found this article, and was mildly surprised by it. Courtesy of the Huff Post --- http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/08/05/beatles-things-you-didnt-know_n_5648410.html AnneNR
  3. Courtesy of "Ultimate Classic Rock" website is another interesting article of historic note. Most of the time, famous musicians write about what they know: sex, drugs, girls. Stuff like that. Sometimes they go a little deeper, penning songs that aim to get at life’s eternal truths, uncovering little pearls of wisdom among the riffs and ruins. And sometimes they freak everyone out by writing songs that predict their own deaths. And we’re not talking “Yeah, I’ll be dead 50 years from now, baby, so let’s get it on†sorta lines. We’re talking about songs that nail specifics, like date, cause and even the tiniest details of their deaths. Were these Famous Musicians Who Correctly Predicted Their Own Death clairvoyant? Or did they just get lucky in guessing their unlucky demises? **Two years before he released his groundbreaking debut album ‘Are You Experienced,’ Jimi Hendrix recorded a self-mythologizing song called ‘The Ballad of Jimi’ that not only elevated the subject of the song (some dude named Jimi) to a sort of heroic status, it also predicted his death. The slow, bluesy cut — which Hendrix recorded with R&B artist Curtis Knight — never showed up on an album, but fans are more than aware of it, especially since the song is “dedicated to the memory of . . . Jimi.†Lines like â€Many things he would try / For he knew soon he’d die,†â€Now Jimi’s gone, he’s not alone / His memory still lives on†and â€Five years, this he said / He’s not gone, he’s just dead†weirdly predict the legend’s death and legacy five years later. ***John Lennon famously retired from the shackles of fame and the music business in 1975, walking away from his myth and legend to take care of his baby son. Five years later, he returned to the studio to lay down a whole bunch of songs that would result in the ‘Double Fantasy’ album. Lennon was so prolific during this period that many of the songs were left unfinished. Following his tragic death on Dec. 8, 1980, the leftover material eventually found its way on posthumous albums. ‘Borrowed Time,’ inspired by a harrowing sailing trip, includes the line â€Living on borrowed time without a thought for tomorrow†and was reportedly the first song recorded after Lennon resumed his career. It ended up on 1984′s ‘Milk and Honey‘ LP, where its lyrics seemed eerily, and sadly, prescient. ***There are so many bizarre things going on with Lynyrd Skynyrd's ‘Street Survivors‘ album that we get all weirded out just thinking about them. First, there’sthe cover of the 1977 LP, which features the band engulfed in flames. Knowing what comes next — three days after the album’s release, the band’s plane went down, killing frontman Ronnie Van Zant and others — is enough to freak out even people who aren’t freaked out by these kinds of things. And then there’s the words to ‘That Smell,’ one of the album’s most popular songs: â€Say you’ll be alright come tomorrow, but tomorrow might not be here for you,†“Angel of darkness upon you,†â€The smell of death surrounds you.†It may have been written as a cautionary drug tune, but following the events of Oct. 20, 1977, ‘That Smell’ takes on a whole new, and creepily prescient, meaning. ***Sixteen years before he died of lung cancer in 2003,Warren Zevon recorded a song about a blue-collar worker that pretty much foreshadowed his own death. ‘The Factory’ appeared on Zevon’s 1987 comeback album ‘Sentimental Hygiene,’ and chronicles the life of a man who grows up to be a factory worker just like his dad. After Zevon hammers home his point about the uselessness of it all, he ends with these stinging lines: â€Kickin’ asbestos in the factory / Punchin’ out Chryslers in the factory / Breathin’ that plastic in the factory.†Zevon died of advanced malignant mesothelioma, which is often caused by exposure to asbestos. Thing is, Zevon never worked in a factory, so his odds of developing cancer there were nil. Yet, somehow, a decade and a half before the end, he predicted the cause of his death. ***Marc Bolan looked like a rock star. And he usually sang about the usual rock-star things in his songs with T. Rex. He inspired a whole legion of glitter-wearing fans to follow his every word. And on the 1972 single ‘Solid Gold Easy Action,’ he seemed to have a knack for predicting the future — even foreshadowing his own demise five years later. Look no further than the opening line of ‘Solid Gold Easy Action,’ a single-only release that eventually showed up on the same year’s ‘Great Hits’ compilation. â€Life is the same and it always will be / Easy as picking foxes from a tree,†Bolan sings as typically glammy guitars spill out a riff. Turns out that the license plate on the car that Bolan was killed in on Sept. 16, 1977, was “FOX 661L.†And oh yeah, it was wrapped around a tree. Spooky, huh? AnneNR
  4. Ever been surprised by some in the music industry that HAVEN'T died as we might have expected them to do? I sure did, I mean, who hasn't said to themselves or others --- "GEEZ! How have they stayed alive this long??!" I came across this little gem, and it does make one wonder why they haven't passed on yet --- nothing short of miraculous to me ---- . . . and this is just the "Top 10" noted . . . how many others are there ? AnneNR
  5. HaPpY BirThDAy MikeWNY !

    I hope everything is sensational for you today --- smile, God loves you, you've been blessed with another birthday!!! Have fun, go out and do something different than you normally do, and enjoy the company of those near and dear to you. And don't forget to eat some absolutely tasty, horrible for your diet, SCRUMPTIOUS CAKE YAY!!! AnneNR 6 6 __/
  6. On Shabat Night Live. . .

    Okay, so I am watching an episode of "Shabat Night Live" from Aviv Moon studios out of North Carolina, part of a series called "A Rood Awakening", and the host-- Michael Rood-- introduces a composer-musician Brad Bailey for a music spot near the end of the program. Now I know what a "Banjo Guitar" is, my hubby plays guitar and told me about this instrument and that it is something he would like to acquire --- but --- the musician I mentioned was using something I have never heard my hubby speak of : a "Bass-Banjo-Guitar" !! This has got to be one of the coolest things I have ever heard played upon recently, and I am wondering if there are any other musicians and/or musical groups that use this neat stringed instrument !??? I kept thinking there was a bass player somewhere behind him, then they showed the close up of the strings, and the upper 3 were black, thick and very rubbery looking, and the bottom 4 (I think it was 4) were steel strings. It essentially sounded like Brad Bailey was accompanying himself. Does anyone know of anyone else who uses this instrument in their songs????? I'd like to hear more compositions using this Bass-Banjo-Guitar. AnneNR 6 6 __/
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